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    This module is included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

    Review Status: In Review

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Dance: reflection

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 5

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE REFLECTION

Module 9

DANCE

ACTIVITY 1

TO TAKE AN ACTIVE ROLE DISCUSSION ABOUT INTERPRETATIONS AND REACTION TO DANCE: REFLECTION

[LO 2.1]

Because South Africa is multicultural it is important to explore the different dances found in our country. Who knows, you might find a dance you would like to learn!

Your educator will show you a video of a dance or dances.

As you are watching the video, NOTE THE FOLLOWING:

shape – round, twisted

size – narrow, wide, small, large

speed – slow, fast, sudden, enduring

tension – strong, light, forceful, gentle

direction – backwards, forward, sideways, up, down

levels – high, middle, low

continuity – flowing freely, hesitant, ongoing, stopping

pathways on the floor – curved or straight, squares, circles, zig-zag

actions – jumps, travelling, turning

costumes

make-up

music

set

mood – happy, sad, calm, angry

feelings and emotions – caring, proud, greedy, scared

Write down the answers to the following questions on a sheet of paper or in your workbook after you have viewed the video.

1. What part of the dance was the most exciting?

2. Was there a message in the dance?

3. Can you suggest any other way to end the dance?

4. What part of the dance would you like to dance?

5. What movements did you observe?

6. What do you feel about what you saw?

7. What was original or imaginative about the dance?

8. What did the dance tell you about the people and their environment?

9. Was there a story in the dance? Describe.

10. Describe the music, costumes and set

Assessment Chart

Table 1
Learners should be able to: 1 2 3 4
Comment on the music, dance, costumes, etc. and their feelings about them: was unable to comment was able to comment reasonably was able to comment well could identify successfully and comment well
Describe and comment on appropriateness, range, variety, originality of body actions and use of body parts in the dance they saw: could not comment on or describe could describe and comment reasonably could describe and comment well successfully identified, described and commented
Participate actively and with confidence in the class discussion: did not participate participated reasonably participated well participated actively and with confidence and insight
Understand and completed the questionnaire successfully: did not complete the questionnaire partially completed the questionnaire completed the questionnaire well understood and completed the questionnaire successfully

ACTIVITY 2

TO IDENTIFY AND DESCRIBE: DANCES IN SOUTH AFRICA

[LO 2.2]

There are various kinds of dancing in South Africa because the population is made up of different ethnic groups. It is interesting to differentiate between the different dances.

Explore the following dances:

Folk dances: Spanish dancing, Irish dancing (e.g. The River Dance), African tribal dancing, Indian dancing, etc.

Latin-American dancing: tango, cha-cha, samba, etc.

Stage dancing: Ballet, Modern dancing, Broadway Musicals, Movie Musicals

Modern social dancing: disco, hip-hop, break dancing, club dancing

Exercise 1:

Try to find as many pictures as possible on dances you have seen in South Africa.

Make a list of the many dances you know of in South Africa.

Describe and/or demonstrate each dance to your class.

If possible bring to class something unique about the dances you have written down, e.g. music, costume, pictures, musical instruments, make-up, etc.

Write down the following about the dance you have chosen.

Name of dance:

What to bring along:

Name of music:

History of the dance:

Assessment

Table 2
Learners should be able to: 1 2 3 4
identify different types of dances: could not do could do reasonably identified most of the dances identified and could compare all the dances discussed
present the exercise with confidence: did not present with self- confidence presented with little self- confidence presented with enough self- confidence presented successfully with self- confidence
research and present the project assigned by the educator: could not do did reasonable research and presentation research and presentation good research and presentation done with insight and understanding

Assessment

LO 2

REFLECTINGThe learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts.

We know this when the learner:

DANCE

2.1 takes an active role in a class discussion about interpretations and reactions to a dance seen live or on television; pays attention to the use of design elements, the purpose and the style of the dance;

2.2 identifies and describes the many kinds of dances in South Africa.

DRAMA

2.3 reflects on drama (television, radio, community or classroom) in terms of:

  • recognising key moments in a drama;
  • identifying themes, ideas and moods;
  • explaining why particular techniques were used;
  • being sensitive to the social and cultural contexts;

MUSIC

2.4 recognises the letter names of notes on lines and in spaces on a treble staff and their difference in pitch;

2.5 recognises crotchet, minim and quaver note values and rests in a short melody;

2.6 recognises and describes the different timbres of voices in choral music;

2.7 listens to a variety of selected songs and identifies the genre (e.g. Blues, Pop, Kwaito, Classical, Traditional, Free-Kiba, Opera, Musicals, Malombo, Kwassa-Kwassa, Techno, Soukous), and offers opinion on the style;

VISUAL ARTS

2.8 differentiates between various art forms such as drawing, painting, architecture, sculpture, design, craftwork, and graphic media;

2.9 responds to images and craft objects used in popular culture, pictures and photographs in terms of purpose, content, form, contrast and meaning.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY 1

In this module the learner must be able to reflect on and offer opinions on dance processes, products and concepts.

The learner must take an active role in a class discussion about interpretations and reactions to a dance seen live or on television and pays attention to the use of design elements, the purpose and the style of the dance.

The main emphasis must be placed on developing the learners’ knowledge of the many dimensions of the art of dance. In the context of performing dances, by making reference to theatre dance examples students can become acquainted with the public notion of what constitutes skilfully-executed dance movements through experience of dances performed by professionals.

Viewing dance on video

Movements are transient, illusive and complex.

The view of dancers on video is two-dimensional, though of course, the movement itself is three-dimensional.

The educator needs to help the learners to see the dance as it passes through time.

It is necessary to provide frameworks or leading questions to guide perception.

This requires observation, description and interpretation.

Exercise 1: Viewing and Interpreting

Let the learners observe the dance and draw comparisons.

Let the learners describe, interpret, make evaluative comments on what they see.

Let the learners observe how movements are repeated; depict the mood of the dance.

Let the learners describe how the movements enhanced the feelings and meaning of the dance;

Let the learners describe the qualities in a phrase of movements;

Let the learners select the most appropriate movements;

Ask the learners for words to describe these qualities and write them on the board;

Let the learners talk about the feelings that the dance evokes in them (positive or negative);

Let the learners comment on the costumes, music, make up and set and how these elements

contribute to the theme of the dance they have viewed.

Ask the learners for words that describe the qualities and write them on the blackboard.

Exercise 2: Class Discussion

Divide the class up in groups of four or five.

Each group has a questionnaire to fill in.

Let the groups elect a representative to present their evaluations and reflections to the rest of the class;

Let the groups have a class discussion after all the groups have delivered their evaluations.

Helpful Hints:

Show the video more than once.

While the learners are watching the video point out certain aspects and contrasts: speed, tension, continuity, rhythm, shape, size, direction, level, simple spatial relationships.

Note that all comments from the learners are valid – even if they seem wrong to you.

Encourage the learners to give opinions and comments.

Be enthusiastic.

View the video first before showing it to the class and make notes on any aspect of the dance you want to discuss with the class.

Be generous with honest praise for all learners.

Talk with learners individually about their feelings about dance outside the class.

ACTIVITY 2: DANCES FOUND IN SOUTH AFRICA

Because South Africa is a multicultural country there is a variety of dances to present to the learners via pictures, video, theatre.

Over the centuries the social and religious dances separated from spectacular dances. From the former branch grew the folk dances which, in turn, produced new social dances from the Middle Ages onwards. The spectacular dances and some religious ones, with much cross-fertilization from folk dances, provided the stock from which great dance dramas of the East and the drama and stage dances of the West were off-shoots. Forms of dance vary greatly, but its two essentials are found everywhere. These are rhythm and movement.

Explore the following dances with your class:

Folk dances

Spanish dancing, Irish dancing (e.g. The River Dance), African Tribal dancing, Indian dancing

Ballroom dancing

The waltz, the two-step, the fox-trot

Latin American dancing

Tango, cha-cha, samba, etc.

Stage dancing

Ballet, Modern, Broadway Musicals, Film Musicals

Modern Social dancing

Disco, hip hop, break dancing, club dancing

Have the class identify and describe the many different kinds of dances found in South Africa.

This must be done at the end in their journals and then handed in.

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