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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

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Distinguish between various art forms

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 5

CRITICAL AND CREATIVE REFLECTION

Module 10

VISUAL ART

ACTIVITY 1

TO BE ABLE TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN VARIOUS ART FORMS

[LO 2.8]

In Modules 1 to 9 you worked with drawing, painting, design, handicraft, and collage techniques. In Module 10 sculpture, architecture and graphic media will be studied.

STEP 1

As we are surrounded by a variety of art objects, statues and works of

art in our daily lives, it is essential that learners can distinguish between all the various visual art forms ( drawing, painting, architecture, sculpturing, design, handicraft and graphic media)..

Study the illustrations below and decide which form of art

(architecture, design, handiwork, drawing, paint, graphic art, sculpture) belongs to which illustration.

Various Art Forms

After the educator has discussed the various art forms with you, you must make a short summary of each form to correspond with the illustration.

A:

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

B:

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

C:

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

D:

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

E:

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

F:

Figure 6
Figure 6 (graphics6.png)

G:

Figure 7
Figure 7 (graphics7.png)

STEP 2

For homework you must collect your own examples of each art form and keep them in your journal.

ACTIVITY 2

TO MAKE A MOBILE WITH/OF MIXED MEDIA

[LO 2.8]

Bring a wire hanger as basis for the mobile ( a work of art which is hung and must be able to bring forth movement). Look at the examples of the various forms of art to serve as inspiration for your own creation of a variety of art forms.

You can, e.g., make a drawing, paint a picture, make a “wire-man”, a house of cardboard, a string of beads or a sweet-paper, or print a pattern on cloth with a potato.

If you cannot obtain materials or media, pictures of certain art forms can be pasted onto cardboard and used. As many examples of various forms of art as possible must then be hung from the wire hanger, tied by thread.

The completed mobile can be displayed in the classroom or elsewhere in the school building.

Figure 8
Figure 8 (graphics8.png)

ACTIVITY 3

TO UNDERSTAND THE PURPOSE AND MEANING OF POPULAR CULTURE

[LO 2.9]

STEP 1

The educator will provide you with a copy of a television programme for one day. See how many kinds of programmes you can recognise. Enter them into a table that you draw on a sheet of paper in your workbook, using the headings as below:

Genres/Types Of Television Programmes

Table 1
NAME OF PROGRAMME TYPE OF PROGRAMME

STEP 2

Complete the following questionnaire:

1. Name your favourite television programme.

2. Why do you like it?

3. Could the programme influence you to change your opinion?

4. Why?/Why not?

5. What in the programme is familiar to you?

6. What would you feel like if you were unable to watch your programme for a month?

7. Would you miss important information if you could not watch it?

8. Do you think new technology could change your television watching

habits?

9. Why?/Why not?

10. Which firm or product is advertised regularly when you watch your programme?

11. Do the adverts suit the programme?

12. Why?/Why not?

13. Which advert do you find the most amusing?

14. What in the advert makes you laugh?

15. Which character in the advert do you like best?

16. Why do you like this character?

STEP 3: My Advertisement character

Create your own advertisement character for an imaginary product.

First choose the product (sweets, breadkfast cereal, soap, toys, computer equipment, video games, fast food, clothes, etc.) which your character will advertise and then draw the character:

Keep it simple, clear and tempting.

Assessment

LO 2

REFLECTINGThe learner will be able to reflect critically and creatively on artistic and cultural processes, products and styles in past and present contexts.

We know this when the learner:

DANCE

2.1 takes an active role in a class discussion about interpretations and reactions to a dance seen live or on television; pays attention to the use of design elements, the purpose and the style of the dance;

2.2 identifies and describes the many kinds of dances in South Africa.

DRAMA

2.3 reflects on drama (television, radio, community or classroom) in terms of:

  • recognising key moments in a drama;
  • identifying themes, ideas and moods;
  • explaining why particular techniques were used;
  • being sensitive to the social and cultural contexts;

MUSIC

2.4 recognises the letter names of notes on lines and in spaces on a treble staff and their difference in pitch;

2.5 recognises crotchet, minim and quaver note values and rests in a short melody;

2.6 recognises and describes the different timbres of voices in choral music;

2.7 listens to a variety of selected songs and identifies the genre (e.g. Blues, Pop, Kwaito, Classical, Traditional, Free-Kiba, Opera, Musicals, Malombo, Kwassa-Kwassa, Techno, Soukous), and offers opinion on the style;

VISUAL ARTS

2.8 differentiates between various art forms such as drawing, painting, architecture, sculpture, design, craftwork, and graphic media;

2.9 responds to images and craft objects used in popular culture, pictures and photographs in terms of purpose, content, form, contrast and meaning.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY 1

Requirements Learner journals

In Modules 1 and 2 the learners worked with drawing, painting, design, handicraft, and collage techniques. In Module 3 sculpture, architecture and graphic media will be studied.

As we are surrounded by a variety of art objects, statues and works of art in our daily lives, it is essential that learners can distinguish between all the various visual art forms (drawing, painting, architecture, sculpturing, design, handicraft and graphic media).

Let the learners look at the illustrations in their modules and then decide which term (architecture etc) belongs to which illustration.

Answers: A = Drawing; B = Painting; C = Architecture; D = Sculpture; E = Designing; F = Handicraft; G = Graphic Art

Continue with a class discussion on the above-mentioned art forms, so that the learner can give a definition or description of each art form below the illustration.

ACTIVITY 2: MOBILE MIXED MEDIA

Requirements: Journals/ wire hangers/ thread/ variety of media and waste products.

Each learner must use a wire hanger as basis of the mobile (a work of art which is hung and must be able to bring forth movement). Look at the examples of the various forms of art to serve as inspiration for their own creation of a variety of art forms. If the learners cannot obtain materials or media, pictures of certain art forms can be pasted onto carton and used. As many examples of various forms of art as possible must then be hung from the wire hanger tied by thread. The completed mobile can be hung in the classroom or elsewhere in the school building. A good place would be the foyer of the school.

ACTIVITY 3: POPULAR CULTURE

Requirements: A photostat copy of a television programme for one day for each learner/pencils/pastels or wax crayons

STEP 1

Hand out the photostats to each learner. Ask them to identify various types or genres of programmes and to write down as many as possible in their journals.

(Example soap, comedy, sport, news, drama, discussion programme, thriller, animation etc.)

STEP 2

The learners must complete the questionnaire in their workbooks or on a sheet of paper.

STEP 3

The learners must each create an advertisement character for their imaginary product, in their workbooks or on a sheet of paper.

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