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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

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Rock music

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 8

EXPRESSION AND COMMUNICATION

Module 5

ROCK MUSIC

MUSIC

Activity 1.1

To enjoy rock music and to discuss the use of instruments in rock music

  • Listen to extracts from the five recordings and answer the questions:
  • Where do you think the examples could be heard?
  • Is the music old-fashioned or modern?
  • Is it vocal or/and instrumental music?
  • Which instrument/s is/are more dominant (can you hear)?
  • Do you think the music is suitable for dancing?
  • What type of dancing?
Table 1
  Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 Example 4 Example 5
           
           
           
           
           
  • Compare the instrumentation in the following examples by using ticks to show which instruments are present.
Table 2
  Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
Strings      
Woodwind      
Trumpet or saxophone      
Electric guitar      
Drums      
Keyboard      

“Rock has come to stay!”

  • If you are under the impression that rock is listened to by teenage audiences only, you are in for a big surprise. Believe me, rock was there in the time of your parents (perhaps even your grandparents!).
  • Rock music has its origin in the 1950’s, just after the Second World War as a part of the popular youth culture. Thus, the “older” listeners’ taste in music was formed then. Many of today’s artists use ideas that they derived from the music of e.g. Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Bob Dylan, the Beatles and Jimi Hendrix.

The first rock music was “Rock-and-Roll”!

  • Rock music developed into different styles, e.g. Disco, Folk/Country, Hard Rock, Pop Rock, Grunge, Punk, New Wave, Reggae, R&B, Soul, Soft Rock, Psychedelic, Garage, Europop, Rap, Heavy Metal, Alternative Rock, Techno, etc.

What is the typical composition of a Rock group?

  • Listen to Rock from the various decades.

Are there similarities with regard to instrumentation?

  • Indicate with ticks the instruments that are present.
Table 3
ROCK MUSIC
BASIC COMPOSITIONOF A ROCK BAND 50’s 60’s 70’s 80’s 90’s 2000
Electric guitars with amplifiers            
Drums            
Vocalist and microphone            
Keyboards            
Other            

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 3.png)

  • Divide into groups and have a brainstorming session. Try to reach consensus before answering the questions below. Remember there might not be a “correct” answer!
  • Complete by making a mark in the correct square!
Table 4
  • Men perform rock music.
YES NO MOSTLY
  • If there are females in the group they normally play the keyboard instruments.
YES NO MOSTLY
  • Men play the drums.
YES NO MOSTLY

Groups compare their answers.

Homework assignment:

Collect information from magazines, the Internet, bands in the area, television and video clips to prove or disprove conclusions!

  • Listen to some of the songs by Atomic Kitten or any other girl band, like the Spice Girls.

Activity 1.2

To discuss the rock music culture with reference to the use of instruments as well as participation by men and women

Rock musicians have created a new youth culture, not only as far as music is concerned, but also in the following:

Fashions – think of the fashions of today and the sixties.

Expressions – “cool”, “peace”!

Ideologies – freedom, rebellion, political preferences, etc.

Since the 50’s, the themes of the lyrics are often love, sexuality, an identity crisis, personal freedom and other questions related to teenagers.

Racial relationships, the economy, politics and cultural preferences followed.

Examples: Blowin’ in the Wind – Bob Dylan and Talk to the people – Johnny Clegg and Savuka (SA).

Since the 80’s, certain “forbidden” themes like drugs, depression, suicide, as well as social issues like nature conservation, abortion and AIDS are touched on.

Recently the lyrics of the American Hip-Hop culture have become aggressive and violent (Gangsta Rap), whereas South Africa’s Kwaito addresses the consequences of bad habits like drugs, crime and even laziness.

  • Read the lyrics from the following songs:

Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 4.png)

Divide into five groups, so that each group can concentrate on one song.

  • Listen to the song while you concentrate on the LYRICS.

The group must first discuss the seven questions before filling in the answers.

  1. What is the message of the song?
  2. Which emotions are being expressed?
  3. Is there any specific pattern with regard to rhyme?
  4. Does the song have any literary, historical or cultural connection?
  5. How does this contribute to the meaning of the song?
  6. Does the song raise any social issues?
  7. Is this a typical topic for Rock music? Motivate your answer.
  • Discuss the musical elements that have been used, for example instrumentation, vocal style, melody, rhythm, form, etc.

Then answer the following questions:

  • Do these elements emphasize the meaning recognized by you earlier?
  • Is the style that which you expected of the lyrics?
  • What is the pattern with regard to the structure of the song?
  • The five groups (whole class) must now compare their answers. Each group must choose a leader who is the spokesperson. Listen to a section of the song that is being discussed.
  • What do these songs have in common?

  • Read the following quotes:

Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 5.png)

QUESTION:

Do you think Rock music followed a similar path as classical and African music? Was it initially performed by men only?

Additional activity

Write your own lyrics to a melody well known to you. You can then get the opportunity to enjoy a Karaoke session. Play a backtrack of the song, while performing the new lyrics. Choose a specific theme beforehand.

Table 5
         
  LO 4.5      
         

Assessment

Table 6
Learning Outcome(LOs)
 
LO 4
EXPRESSING AND COMMUNICATINGThe learner will be able to analyse and use multiple forms of communication and expression in Arts and Culture.
Assessment Standards(ASs)
 
We know this when the learner:
MUSIC
4.5 identifies and explains gender and / or cultural stereotyping in lyrics and in the use of instruments over time and in the present;
DRAMA
4.3 identifies age, gender, class and cultural stereotyping in stories, theatre, film, television or radio over time and in present;4.4 develops a short skit or scenario to highlight problems of stereotyping, discrimination, and prejudice in school or the local community;
DANCE
4.1 understands and speaks about differently-abled people and inclusivity in dance;4.2 debates the roles traditionally assigned to different genders in dance by recognising and expressing different points of view;
VISUAL ARTS
4.6 views and analyses communication within various forms of mass media and identifies obvious or hidden messages, bias, stereotyping or propaganda.

Memorandum

  • INTRODUCTION
  • Focus in this module is on patterns, in terms of instrumentation, lyrics and gender, more specifically in youth culture and its associated rock music (past and present).
  • Although most learners who have experienced music will most probably be able to distinguish between different music cultures (church, jazz or rock), there might be certain individuals who experience difficulty. Discussions by the remainder of the class will help them form an idea of the different styles.
  • (The classical orchestra will be used as starting point, since its composition was dealt with in Grade 7 and is therefore known to the learner.)

The following is a summary of the various activities for Module 2:

WARNING: The teacher must listen to the music before playing it to the class, since not all lyric content may be suitable for use in the classroom! Select appropriate sections.

Activity 1.1

In this activity the learner does active listening, with the aid of a questionnaire about dance music from different music cultures.

Examples to use in this activity

Example 1: Bill Haley and the Comets - "Rock Around The Clock"

or Buddy Holly - Rock and Roll

or any other Rock 'n Roll music from the 1950s

Example 2: Ballet music, for example

Tchaikovsky - Swan Lake

Prokofiev - Romeo and Juliet

Example 3: Bee Gees - Saturday Night Fever

or Staying Alive / Grease

or any other Disco music from the 1970s

Example 4: Louis Armstrong - any of his trumpet recordings

or any other jazz recording

Example 5: Any recording of current popular Music

(beware of inappropriate lyrics)

Enrique Iglesias, Britney Spears, Beeskraal, etc.

The learner will be able to identify the instruments used in Rock when he/she compares Rock to classical music.

Table 7
  Example 1 Example 2 Example 3
Strings    
Woodwind    
Trumpet or saxophone    
Electric guitar    
Drums    
Keyboard    

After this has been done, the learner has to draw comparisons between Rock in the 1950s and Rock today - this indicates that certain instruments are typical of certain music cultures.

Basic composition of a Rock band

Electric guitars with amplifiers

Drum kit

Singer with microphone

Keyboard instruments

Learners normally have a very good knowledge of youth music (often better than the educator!) and will be acquainted with numerous current music styles. Research is easily done, since music videos, CDs and the Internet are commonplace today. Performances by groups from the school or from the surrounding areas can prove successful, under the right circumstances.

Possible examples to use

Table 8
ERA EXAMPLES OF ROCK
50’s Bill Haley & the Comets, Buddy Holly, Elvis Presley
60’s Beach Boys, Beatles, Rolling Stones
70’s Bee Gees, Bob Marley, Led Zeppelin
80’s Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Eurythmics
90’s Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Michael Jackson
2000 Karin Zoid, Limp Bizkit, Britney Spears

Listen to any song by Atomic Kitten, or any other girl band.

Activity 1.2

The focus in this activity is on the pattern in lyrics. In this instance "freedom" and "respect" are used as themes. We approach these themes from a female point of view. We touch on gender stereotyping in rock music simultaneously.

Discuss fashions, sayings/expressions and modes of thought that are prevalent among today's youth. There are various negative connotations too, like the overt use of drugs and alcohol. Bring the disadvantages of these practices to the attention of the learners, e.g. poor concentration and co-ordination (compare this to driving a vehicle under the influence).

This is an ideal opportunity to sensitise the learner to the negative messages that are often conveyed by this type of music. Pop stars often serve as role models for teenagers!

"Freedom" is often taken beyond the mere expression in the lyrics. This is often extended to other aspects of the live performances of many rock stars, for instance in smashing guitars on stage (onstage violence?), indecent exposure, etc. Rock has always been considered as an art form devoid of any rules or boundaries!

Elements of the music:

The basic components (rhythm, melody and form) are easy to recognise. The form scheme is normally that of verse and refrain (i.e. strophic).

Listen to the following recordings, and then do the assignment:

1. Tracy Chapman - "She's Got Her Ticket"

2. Aretha Franklin - "Respect"

3. Jewel - "I'm Sensitive"

4. Helen Reddy - "I Am A Woman"

5. Alanis Morissette - "Perfect"

What the five songs have in common is that the artists are female and that the lyrics deal with freedom and respect.

Additional Activity

Write your own lyrics to a melody well known to you. You can then get the opportunity to enjoy a Karaoke session. Play a backtrack of the song, while performing the new lyrics. Choose a specific theme beforehand.

PRESENTATION OF MUSIC IN THE CLASSROOM

  • The organisation of the classroom is of vital importance to the successful presentation of music. Since the material worked with is sound, the set-up may be potentially noisy.
  • Learners should be disciplined so as to be quiet when music is played in class. In order not to lose the attention of the learners, the excerpts must be short (no longer than 2 minutes) and should be played more than once. The teacher must guide learners in listening to specific elements, with the aid of the suggested activities (expression of opinions and preferences, writing of reviews, analysis of various compositional techniques, interpretation and comparison). It is also important for the learners to realise that there is not necessarily always a correct answer.
  • When listening to music, the learner acquires skill and learns terminology valuable to communication and self-expression. Emotional reaction is also very important. In other words, listening has a dual purpose: the learner must be able to listen to as well as react to the music.
  • Listening also entails listening to performances/recitals by other learners.
  • The teacher must be prepared and have the planned music recordings ready and available in the correct order. Listen to them in advance! It is easier if all the tracks have been pre-recorded in the correct sequence onto tape, since it is not always the beginning of recordings that are most suitable. Also make use of the Internet and available videos to gain background information.
  • Learners should be disciplined to keep instruments quiet when they are not playing them and to refrain from speaking amongst themselves when they should be paying attention.
  • If instruments are not available, body percussion and self-made instruments can be used instead.
  • Assessment must also cultivate values in learners. When learners know that aspects such as the disciplined handling of instruments and quiet listening are also assessed, they will gradually develop respect for these matters.

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