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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

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Popular culture as inspiration

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 8

CREATING, INTERPRETATION AND PRESENTATION

Module 15

POPULAR CULTURE AS INSPIRATION

VISUAL ARTS

In Modules 1,2, and 3 we looked at the symbolism of colours, stereotyping and prejudice, the abuse of human rights and aspects like composition, style and design. In Module 4 we take a close look at popular culture and the use of it as inspiration for the design and creation of artefacts. These artefacts form part of the Drama activity and the second Music activity, where the emphasis also falls on popular culture.

Activity 1:

To define popular culture

[LO 1.5]

The word popular is derived from the Latin word 'popularis' which means 'belonging to the people'. During the 20th century ‘popular’ music and art were shortened to ‘pop’ music and ‘pop’ art.

Popular culture is that which surrounds us every day - clothes, films, music or cars - all form part of popular culture. It does not matter where you go or what you do, you are surrounded by that which is popular: brand names of clothes, titles of films, and advertisements showing your favourite TV programme or food. Popular culture also represents the latest styles and trends which teenagers like. As popular culture and mass production go hand in hand, the mass media and the general buying public determine what is popular. This is why popular culture changes with the times.

The media, like television, radio and magazines, swamp the public with advertisements for new products and make us think that a certain product should be bought . Teenagers are usually the first to buy the latest CD releases, while influential and famous people create the fashion trends and enslave us with their television programmes or films of popular songs. In this way most of us have a favourite music or sports star, model or actor. Big companies place certain people in the public eye with money that has been provided by the public themselves! All the above-mentioned together create popular culture.

STEP 1

  • Complete the following table on your own.

EXAMPLES OF MY POPULAR CULTURE

Table 1
ENTERTAIN-MENT FASHION FOOD LIFE- STYLE MUSIC PLACES TO GO TO SPORT
             
             
             
             
             

STEP 2

  • Public figures or celebrities can influence the youth positively or negatively. Make a list of negative and positive influences in your journals. Use these for a class discussion.

Activity 2:

To identify antique and modern artefacts and their uses/functions

[LO 1.12]

Artefacts are objects made by humans, like weapons, jewellery, tools, clothing, masks, holders for food and water, etc. In archaeology, artefacts provide important leads or clues to the unravelling of human evolution, ecological conditions, and pre-historic civilizations. Some of the oldest artefacts are rough stone implements which date back three million years.

Artefacts are thus man-made objects which were made in the past, but which have been preserved to the present and can be seen as representative of certain cultures. Up to 50 000 years ago, this form of art was used during rituals and ceremonies where, e.g. the spirits were asked for a successful hunting trip. What we regard as antique artefacts today, were actually articles used every day for survival in those cultures, and were definitely not seen as antique or as a form of art.

Today new artefacts are created every day. Think of plates with the images of Charles and Diana, photographs and record covers of the Beatles, clothes worn on stage by Madonna, imitations and new creations of African art, etc.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)
Identify the illustrations below. State which of these objects can be considered as artefacts. Classify the artefacts according to their uses, using the provided table. You can repeat this procedure for the modern artefacts.

Antique artefacts

Table 2
WEAPONS TOOLS CLOTHING JEWELLERY MASKS HOLDERS
           
           
           
           
           

Modern artefacts

Table 3
WEAPONS TOOLS CLOTHING JEWELLERY MASKS HOLDERS
           
           
           
           
           

Add your own examples of the 20th or 21st century to each column of the Modern Artefacts. Think of examples from the popular culture or the mass media: famous pop stars, soapie stars, film idols, etc.

Activity 3:

To design and create a video cover

[LO 1.5]

STEP 1

Draw ONE of the items from each of the seven columns you entered as examples of MY POPULAR CULTURE in Activity 3.1. Fill as much of the page as possible with your seven illustrations. These images/illustrations (e.g. baseball bat, car, cell-phone, etc.) must represent you.

STEP 2

Use your rulers to draw three vertical columns of 7 cm each and 6 horizontal lines of 5 cm across your illustrations - like a chessboard.

STEP 3

Use pastels or paint to fill each space in the first block with a warm colour and the background with a cold colour. In the next block change the warm and cold colours around - fill the form of the block with a cold colour and the background with a warm colour. Proceed like this, changing the colours for each block. (See example below.)

Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 4.png)

Activity 4:

To create an artefact holder

[LO 1.5]

STEP 1

Bring your own cardboard holder to class. The sizes may differ, as long as the holder has a lid.

STEP 2

Tear pieces of paper from magazines to paste onto the holder. Choose two complementary colours, e.g. RED and GREEN / YELLOW and PURPLE / BLUE and ORANGE. The lid can be covered with the one colour and the holder with the other, or the holder and the lid can be covered by both colours, forming patterns and /or forms.

STEP 3

Now paste the video cover that you made in the previous activity onto the lid.

STEP 4

Place five personal artefacts inside the holder. These artefacts can be made or can be finished articles. Then exhibit your holder, together with those of the other learners, in a suitable place in the school building.

Assessment

Table 4
Learning Outcome(LOs)
 
LO 1
creating, interpreting and presentingThe learner will be able to create, interpret and represent work in each of the art forms.
Assessment Standards(ASe)
 
We know this when the learner:
VISUAL ARTS
1.12 creates and presents an artefact using ideas from popular culture or the mass media;
1.13 creates and presents an artefact using ideas from popular culture or the mass media;
1.13.1 differentiation between the organic and inorganic aspects of the built and natural environment in design, observational drawing and two-dimensional and three-dimensional work;
1.13.2 interpretation and expression of own understandings of culture and heritage;
1.14 independently selects, prepares and mounts own artworks for a school presentation.

Memorandum

Activity 1

Requirements: A3 Paper/pencils or pens/scissors/colour pastels and/or paint/Learner Journals.

The word ‘popular’ is derived from the Latin word 'popularis', which means 'belonging to the people'. During the 20th century popular music and art were shortened to ‘pop music’ and ‘pop art’.

Popular culture is that which happens around us every day - clothes, films, music or cars - all form part of popular culture. It does not matter where you go or what you do, you are surrounded by that which is popular: brand names of clothes, titles of films and advertisements showing your favourite TV programme or food. Popular culture also represents the latest styles and trends which teenagers like. As popular culture and mass production go hand in hand, the mass media and the general buying public determine what is popular. This is why popular culture changes with the times.

The media, like television, radio and magazines bombard the public with advertisements for new products and make us think that a certain product is perfect! Teenagers are usually the first to buy the latest CD releases, while influential and famous people create the fashion trends and enslave us with their television programmes/films of popular songs. In this way most of us have a favourite music or sport star, model or actor. Big firms place certain people in the public eye with money that has been provided by the public themselves! All the above-mentioned facts together create popular culture.

STEP 1

Let the learners complete the following table of their personal preferences.

(Examples of possible answers are printed in italics).

EXAMPLES OF MY POPULAR CULTURE

Table 5
ENTERTAINMENT FASHIONS FOOD LIFE STYLE MUSIC PLACES TO GO TO SPORT
DVD’s Nike-shoes McDonalds Cell-phone Rock Shopping Centres Sports stars in adverts
Soapies on TV Levi Jeans Pizzas Motorcycles Rap(Eminem) Film Theatres Skate- boarding
Horror movies Diesel Junk Food Tattoos Kwaito Clubs Role model on TV
Computer games Adidas Milk shakes Navel ring R&B Billiard rooms Soccer
The Simpsons Make-up Chocolates Tongue stud Britney Spears Skating- Rink Racing-car drivers

STEP 2

  • Public figures or celebrities can influence the youth positively or negatively. Give the learners the opportunity to make a list of negative and positive influences in their journals. Use these for a class discussion.

EXAMPLES

Positive - role models like Oprah Winfrey and Joanne Woodward who have strict principles.

Negative - celebrities without principles like Marilyn Manson and Eminem, advertising drugs and singing unsuitable lyrics about violence, thus setting a bad example.

Activity 2

Requirements: Pencils or pens

‘Artefacts’ are objects made by humans, like weapons, jewelry, tools, clothing, masks, holders for food and water, etc. In Archaeology artefacts provide important leads/clues to the unravelling of human evolution, ecological conditions, as well as pre-historic civilisations. Some of the oldest artefacts are rough stone implements that date back to three million years.

Artefacts are thus man made objects that were made in the past, but have been preserved to the present and can be seen as representative of certain cultures. Up to 50 000 years ago, this form of art was used during rituals and ceremonies where e.g. the spirits were asked for a successful hunting trip. What we regard as antique artefacts today, were articles used every day for survival for those cultures and were definitely not seen as antique or as a form of art.

Today new artefacts are created every day. Think of plates with the images of Charles and Diana, photographs and record covers of the Beatles, clothes worn on stage by Madonna, imitations and new creations of African art, etc.

The learners must now identify the illustrations in their modules. State which objects can be considered artefacts. Then they can classify the artefacts according to their uses using the provided table. They can repeat this procedure for the modern artefacts.

ANSWERS

ANTIQUE ARTEFACTS

Table 6
WEAPONS TOOLS CLOTHING JEWELRY MASKS HOLDERS
H I L C G F

MODERN ARTEFACTS

Table 7
WEAPONS TOOLS CLOTHING JEWELRY MASKS HOLDERS
D A B E K J

Ask the learners to add more examples of the 20th or 21st century to each column of the Modern Artefacts. They can think of examples from the popular culture or the mass media: famous pop stars, soapie stars, film idols, etc.

Activity 3

Requirments: White A4-paper/pencils/colour pastels or paint/rulers.

STEP 1

  • Learners draw ONE of the items from each of the seven columns they entered as examples of MY POPULAR CULTURE in Activity 3.1. They must fill as much of the page as possible with their seven illustrations. These images/illustrations (e.g. baseball bat, car, cellphone, etc.) must be representative of the individual.

STEP 2

  • Learners use rulers to draw three vertical columns of 7 cm each and 6 horizontal lines of 5 cm across their illustrations - like a chessboard.

STEP 3

  • Now the learners can use their pastels or paint to fill each space in the first block with a warm colour and the background with a cold colour. In the next block change the warm and cold colours around - fill the form of the block with a cold colour and the background with a warm colour. Proceed with this, changing the colours for each block.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 49.png)

Activity 4

Requirements: Carton holder, e.g shoe box/ old magazines/glue/ video cover of the previous activity/five personal artefacts.

STEP 1

  • Each learner must bring a carton holder to class. The sizes may differ, as long as the holder has a lid. Let the learners tear pieces of paper from the magazines to paste onto the holder. Each learner must choose two complementary colours, e.g. red and green or yellow and purple or blue and orange. The lid can be covered with the one colour and the holder with the other, or both colours forming patterns and / or forms can cover the holder and the lid.

STEP 2

  • The video cover that was made in the previous actvity is now pasted onto the lid.

STEP 3

  • Then the learners must place five personal artefacts inside the holder. These artefacts can be made or can be finished articles. All the learners then exhibit their holders in a suitable place in the school building (preferably where there is security - a room which can be locked or where an eye can be kept - as some of the holders may contain valuable articles).

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A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

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What are tags? tag icon

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