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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

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Contact improvisation

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 9

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL SKILLS

Module 4

CONTACT IMPROVISATION

DANCE / MOVEMENT

Dance can supplement and complement the other components (visual arts, music and drama) through the creation of an advertisement or product.

Use music that featured in the music class to accompany the dance activities

Warming up

  • Warming-up exercises should be increased and done regularly. Warming up should protect the body against injuries, make it more flexible, keep it in good shape and contribute towards the development of technical skills. Movement combinations and sequences should form part of warming-up exercises.
  • Follow the guidance given by the teacher when a series of warming-up exercises is introduced to you. Remember that the repetition of sequences and the correct positioning of the body is always important for the conditioning of the body, to make it more flexible and to develop certain skills.
  • You will also be given the opportunity to create your own combinations and sequences that will include design elements for choreography such as fast, slow, light, flowing, jerking, high, low and quiet or calm.
  • Warming-up and other dance exercises, if done regularly and purposefully, can also prepare and strengthen your body for your favourite sport.

CONTACT IMPROVISATION

  • Stand opposite each other. Place hands in front of chest with the open palms turned towards the other person.
  • Fall towards each other simultaneously and catch each other open handed.
  • Make any spontaneous sound (e.g. ‘oooo’ or ‘aaaa’) during the fall.
  • Sit back to back and make turns to lean on each other. The one supports the other.
  • The shift of weight must happen smoothly.

Reflection

  1. What did it feel like to fall forward?

  1. Did you trust your partner? Why? Why not?

  1. What does trust mean?

  1. Who do you trust most?

Activity 1

GUIDELINES FOR AN OWN COMPOSITION/CHOREOGRAPHY

Follow the presenter’s guidance in creating a composition.

Run anywhere in the open space without bumping into each other, and when the teacher beats on the drum or other instrument, FREEZE! Then form the first alphabetical letter of your first name with your body.

Repeat with a variety of locomotor movements and additions, e.g.

  • Change direction on the drumbeat.
  • Freeze and form the next letter of your name.
  • On each drumbeat from now onwards form another letter of your name.
  • Now choose four different letters from your name and create a shape for each letter.
  • Link the four shapes by means of any locomotor movements, e.g. slide, turn, role, jump, etc.
  • Repeat several times.
  • Practise the sequence and add a variety of levels and directions, e.g. high, low, middle, forward, sidewards, etc.

Repeat until the forms and movements flow from the one to the next.

  • Now add different rhythms and tempos to the sequence, e.g. fast, slow, flowing, staccato, etc.
  • Practise the movements

Work in two’s or three’s and now create your own choreography to advertise a new product (which you have designed in the visual arts class) by means of a TV advertisement or promotion stunt.

  • Attention must be given to the utilization of space. A strong start, middle and ending are essential.
  • You can choose your own music for accompaniment.

The educator will support and monitor by acting as facilitator and by ensuring that you tackle the task within context.

Table 1
         
  LU 3.3      

Assessment

Table 2
Learning Outcomes(LOs)
 
LO 3
participation and cooperationThe learner is able to display personal and social skills while participating in arts and culture activities as an individual and in a group.
Assessment Standards(ASs)
 
This is indicated when the learner:
GENERAL
3.1 is sensitive towards the music and art form choices of others;
3.2 is prepared to explore new cultural ideas and to re-evaluate stereotypes;
3.3 acknowledges own, group and varying identity;
3.4 expresses his or her own contribution in any art form;
3.8 VISUAL ARTS
  • is aware of the influence of the mass media on society;
 
3.7 MUSIC
  • is able to identify and interpret specific elements of music in advertisements and popular music;
3.6 DRAMA
  • is able to share responsibilities within a group;
3.5 DANCE/MOVEMENT
  • is able to demonstrate the creation of complementary shapes by applying dancing skills with a partner, as well as dance sequences;
  • is able to counterbalance his/her weight with a partner.

Memorandum

Warm up exercise:

These exercises can be done to music. Preferably modern pop music to which the learners can relate. Tempo must be approximately between 125 and 136 beats per minute, which is a mid-tempo beat. (Compared to a slow tempo of between 84 and 125 beats per minute and a fast tempo of between 139 and 160 beats per minute.)

Helpful hints:

  • learners should breathe normally throughout the warm up
  • make sure learners have full range of motion when executing each movement
  • count audibly throughout the warm up
  • learners must be able to hear your instructions above the music
  • take note of any learner not executing the exercise properly
  • take note of any learner not knowing left from right

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A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

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