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    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Arts & Culture (Gr. 7-9)
    By: Siyavula

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Simple and regular beat/rhythm

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 9

CREATING, INTERPRETATION AND PRESENTATION

Module 17

SIMPLE AND REGULAR BEAT/RHYTHM

MUSIC

Example of a simple and regular beat/rhythm:

Figure 1
Figure 1 (Picture 1.png)

Examples of irregular beat

Figure 2
Figure 2 (Picture 2.png)
Figure 3
Figure 3 (Picture 3.png)

Example of compound time:

In compound time, each beat is divided into 3, in contrast with the simple time where each beat is divided into 2.

Figure 4
Figure 4 (Picture 4.png)

In this case, there are 4 beats, i.e. compound quadruple time.

Figure 5
Figure 5 (Picture 5.png)

STEP 2: Performing of various metres

As soon as you are familiar with the different beat meters, you can perform them in the following manner:

- Body percussion

Combination of clapping, hitting fists against each other, clap on thighs

- drums

Combination of various drum techniques (slap, tone, bass)

STEP 3: Application

The following quote was taken from a speech at the unveiling of a monument on Heritage Day (1996). Read the quote and then answer the questions.

Table 1
1.
Who, do you think, made this speech?
 
2.
To which song does the "it" refer?
 
3.
In whose honour was the monument erected?
 
4.
Why?
 
5.
Who composed "Die Stem" (The Call of South Africa?)
 
6.
Who was responsible for the words of "Die Stem"?
 
7.
Mention other examples of music heritage from your own culture.
 

Follow the educator's instructions in the performing of the song.

STEP 4: Application

Examples of music from my own culture:

Check out the following website to see what heritage means to well-known people: http://www.sahra.org.za/what.htm

Table 2
Activity To organise and market a production LO 1.10  

Have you ever wondered who is responsible for everything you see and hear in a production? Why is the production being presented? Who is responsible for the programme? Where do the funds for the costumes come from? Who is responsible for the sound effects?

At the end of this activity you should have all the answers.

STEP 1: Group

Conceptualisation

“Make an occasion of....................!”

As a class, discuss and then decide on an occasion for a musical performance that you can plan, organise and market.

Use the following guidelines for your decision-making process. As soon as you have finalised the type of production and theme, complete the table to highlight problem areas and to make notes.

Table 3
Target group  
Aim  
Type of production  
Facilities  
Equipment  
Talent  
Time Date:
Finances  
Other  
FINAL DECISION:

STEP 2: Individual

From the discussion and decision-making process, you will have realised that you do not only need an orchestra and singers for the production!

There are several other aspects to consider, which also require creativity, planning and organization, in order to stage a successful production:

- administrative: (e.g. financial aspects, fund-raisers, tickets)

- artistic: (e.g. dancers, designers)

- technical: (e.g. lights)

Name four advantages that a production has for the community:

STEP 3: Individual

Study the following table. The educator will define each aspect.

Then you must indicate which section or sub-section interests you. Take your talents and interests into consideration - do not be modest!

Table 4
Marketing Production
             
Fundraiser Advertising Other Technical Design Dance Music
  - publicity - programme - tickets- refreshments - lightning- stage- sound - decor- costumes- props    

Motivate why you think you can make a contribution to a specific section:

STEP 4: Homework Individual

To get an idea of what a production implies, it is a good idea to take a close look at the programme of other productions.

Collect examples of programmes of school or professional performances like musicals, revues, etc.

Exhibit these in your classroom or paste them into your journal.

Critically compare two of these programmes and state your preferences:

Table 5
  Programme 1 Programme 2
Cover/ Front page    
Composition    
Lay-out    
Lay-out of the production team    
Cast    
Table 6
Photographs    
Advertisements    
Sponsors    
Others:    
     
     
     

STEP 5: Planning with regard to Marketing

Then choose a Production Manager (it may be the educator).

The Production Manager is responsible for the administration.

Divide into the following sections. Each group chooses a leader.

Table 7
Fund-raising Fund-raising co-ordinator
Advertising Publicity co-ordinatorProgramme co-ordinator
Tickets Ticket co-ordinator
Refreshments Refreshments co-ordinator

Each sub-section hands in a written plan and budget to the Production Manager.

Paste these into your learner journals.

STEP 6: P lanning for the Production itself

All the learners are given the opportunity to participate in the artistic and technical aspects.

Choose a PRODUCER (it may be the educator).

The producer makes the final decision with regard to the production.

Discuss the production.

A production assistant is responsible for the administrative work.

Divide into the following sections. Each group chooses a leader.

Table 8
Technical Lightning – Lighting Designer and crew
  Stage – Stage Manager and crew
  Sound – Sound Manager and crew
Design Decor - Set Designer and crew
  Costumes – Costume Designer and helpers
  Props – Property Manager
  Dance – Choreographer and dancers
  Music - Music Producer, orchestra and singers

Each section plans in co-operation with the PRODUCER.

Each section hands in a budget to the PRODUCTION MANAGER.

Planning (in the form of sketches) and budgets are pasted into your learner journals.

Research the "job" you have to do!

SUGGESTIONS:

Limit yourself to one item.

  • The Music Producer and the Producer must do their planning first so that they can provide the technical team, designers and choreographer with the necessary information (song, lyric, style, rhythm, tempo, atmosphere, background, events on the stage).
  • Choice of song: Choose a song from your culture or environment or use the national anthem. Although decor and dance are included, they are not essential.
  • Can you perform the song according to your planning?

Assessment

Table 9
Learning Outcome(LOs)
 
LO 1
creating, interpreting and presentingThe learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms.
Assessment Standards(ASe)
 
We know this when the learner:
DANCE
1.1 participates in the choreography and presentation of a short dance for a performance or cultural event;1.2 in preparing the body, accurately performs a set warm-up and skill-building sequence, including body conditioning and dance technique in a particular style;1.3 moves across space in movement sequences with co-ordination, musicality, quality, style, balance and control;1.4 learns and performs, with appropriate style and movement quality, works choreographed by others from at least two cultures, which may be:
1.4.1 classical / traditional (African, Eastern or Western);
1.4.2 contemporary;
1.5 creates a dance that fuses steps or styles from more than one South African dance form with a clear beginning, middle and ending.
DRAMA
1.6 conducts a simple warm-up routine with the class;1.7 participates in an aspect of planning, organising, advertising, marketing, fund-raising or producing a dramatic item for an audience;
MUSIC
graphics1.png1.9 makes music using voice, available percussion or melodic instruments for performance in meters;1.10 organises and markets a musical performance with regard to planning, advertising, fund-raising and producing;

Memorandum

  • STEP 1

Time Signature

54,74, 128 and 44 all refer to specific beats, i.e. how many beats there are in each bar.

Thus far in the modules, the emphasis has been on simple and regular time. Here the learner will come into contact with irregular meters. Follow the explanation of each and let the learners clap the bars repeatedly. Pay attention to the underlying accents.

Figure 6
Figure 6 (Picture 73.png)

  • More examples: Triple and duple time

Examples of irregular meters

Figure 7
Figure 7 (Picture 74.png)
  • An example from music literature is Dave Brubeck’s Take Five.
  • There are two possibilities for the sub-division namely: 3 + 2 or 2 + 3
Figure 8
Figure 8 (Picture 75.png)
  • An example from music literature is Dave Brubeck's Unsquare Dance.
  • A possible sub-division is 2 + 2 + 3

Example of a compound time

Figure 9
Figure 9 (Picture 76.png)
  • In compound time, each beat is divided into 3, in contrast with simple time where each beat is divided into 2. In this case there are 4 beats, i.e. compound quadruple time.
Figure 10
Figure 10 (Picture 77.png)
  • More examples: 68- and 98-beat
  • STEP 2

As soon as the learners are familiar with the respective meters they can perform them as follows:

  • body percussion
  • combination of clapping, hitting fists on each other, clapping on thighs
  • drums
  • Combination of various drum techniques as explained in Module 4 Grade 6.

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