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Animals in the Wild - Eating habits

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Animals in the wild

EDUCATOR SECTION

Memorandum

To the educator:

Using progress reports and profiles of the learners in Grade 1, the Grade 2 educator can assess the ability of each learner in the class.

The Grade 2 educator also needs to know which work has been covered in Grade 1 so that she can revise, consolidate and re-teach where necessary, before proceeding to the Grade 2 phonics, writing, reading etc. Make sure the learners understand the written instructions on each page. The learners furthermore need to know where and when to go for help when doing written work e.g. finding out how to spell a word etc.

The slower learners need continual support whereas the fast learners can be given additional work based on the activities for further stimulation.

TIME SCHEDULE FOR THE MODULES 1 – 7

All learners should complete all seven modules during the year. Allow them to progress at their own speed covering ± one and a half modules per term.

Learners learn about adaptation of animals in the wild. They discuss their differences and similarities e.g. eating habits, camouflage, and environments.

The advantages and disadvantages of animals in Zoo’s are discussed.

  • Phonics: st, ee, oo
  • Writing: Cc, Gg, Oo, Qq

integration of themes

a healthy environment

Discuss keeping nature reserves and Zoo’s clean. Become sensitive to animals’ needs when discussing food cycles and the animals’ environment. How does this affect humans?

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)
Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)
Table 1
LO 2.3   LO 2.4.8   LO 4.2  

Read the fable that follows to the learners, showing the pictures of the animals eating. Explain that Aesop wrote fables as stories with a lesson or moral. Discuss the lesson in this story, namely consideration for others.

Read the story a second time, then ask the learners to remember what the fox and stork said to each other. Write the dialogue in the speech bubbles.

You are referred to the page with the two pictures: one of the fox and stork eating peas from a plate and one with them eating out of long narrow glasses (almost like vases), with speech bubbles for the dialogue. The children need not use the exact words, but the same meaning should be conveyed

The fox had invited the stork to dinner. He set out the plates and filled them with his favourite meal - peas. When the stork arrived he stared at the table in dismay. Try as he might, he could not pick up a single pea.

" Oh, I see you are not enjoying the meal," said the fox. " Well, I cannot let it go to waste. I had better eat it for you".

So saying, he gobbled down the stork's dinner as well as his own.

" That was lovely. We should do this again some time."

The stork was hungry and now he was angry as well. But he was also clever.

"We should indeed. However, this time you must be my guest!"

When the fox arrived for dinner, the stork has set out two tall, narrow glasses.

"I have prepared a special dish for you," said the stork.

Sadly for the fox he never even tasted it, for his snout could not reach into the long narrow container.

"I see you have no appetite," said the stork. "I had better finish it for you."

The hungry fox had to sit and watch while the stork ate the two dinners.

Table 2
LO 1.3.2   LO 1.3.5   LO 1.3.6  

Discuss the fact that many animals eat different kinds of food and how they are adapted for eating or catching their different meals.

Read the story about eating habits and the subsequent activity.

Always read through first and check for sight words, which may not be familiar to the learners. Make flashcards of these words and practise them.

Read and discuss the poem about people’s taste.

Table 3
LO 2.4.1   LO 2.4.6   LO 2.4.5  

LEANER SECTION

Content

Eating Habits

  • What would you like for lunch? Write it down here.

Do you think a rabbit would like to eat that? Do you think a parrot could eat your ice cream?

Most animals would not like our food. They might eat it if they were hungry, but it is not always good for them.

Nature needs to make sure that different animals like different kinds of food, otherwise everyone would eat the same food and soon there would be none left.

Animals in the wild have to find their own food. Some animals eat grass and leaves, for example buck, elephant, zebra and giraffe. These animals live near each other and they eat the same food. Their food doesn't run out because they move about a lot. The food does not run out for another reason. Giraffes eat the leaves at the tops of trees, while buck eat leaves from the lower branches. The elephant uses his trunk to reach his food. It is also useful for picking fruit.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)
Table 4
LO 2.5   LO 3.3.1  

Birds have different shaped beaks. The different shapes are suited to the kind of food that they like to eat. Seedeaters have short pointed bills. Fruit-eaters, like parrots, have a bill like a hook to dig into the fruit. Birds of prey have sharp beaks. They are also like a hook and can bite the flesh of the animals they catch.

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

Even in the sea we see how the animals’ mouths are shaped to help them catch their food. The blue whale has an enormous mouth. He can open his mouth and filter his food through the baleen that hangs down in front of his mouth.

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.wmf)
  • How well did you understand?
  • Questions for discussion.
  • Why don’t we all eat the same food?
  • Why can't parrots eat ice cream?
  • What will happen if I give 'human food ' to a buck?
  • What is baleen?
Table 5
LO 3.1.3   LO 3.2.1   LO 3.3.3   LO 5.2.3  
  • How well have you read?

1. Which animals like to eat grass and leaves?

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

2. What sort of food do birds eat? Name three different kinds.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

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3. Find a word which means:

huge - ...........................................................................................................................

not the same - ...............................................................................................................

elephant’s nose - .............................................................................................................

4. Could the whale have a small mouth? Say why you think so.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

Table 6
LO 4.1.1   LO 4.1.2  
  • Listen to the poem as your teacher reads it.

Some people

Some people like coffee. Others like tea.

Animals aren't as fussy or so it seems to me.

They each seem to fancy a special kind of diet.

I'm not crazy about most of them, but why don't you try it?

Grasshoppers can be quite delicious, I've heard,

That is, if you're a frog, scaly reptile or bird.

There's many a bird that'd really fancy ‘em,

Unless of course they're vegetarian

Grasses of all sorts and leaves of all kinds,

Are enough to send some animals out of their minds.

Giraffes and buffalo, gorillas and buck,

Get rumbling tummies at the sight of the stuff.

I've known many an animal be partial to lice,

And while you and I won't think that nice.

Just watch the monkeys and chimpanzees,

Why, to them they're almost as good as the fleas.

Now we may all be gagging and clutching our throats,

But a whale can't imagine anything worse than a coke!

It's quite a healthy thing you see,

To have some people prefer coffee while others like tea.

Table 7
LO 1.3.6   LO 1.3.7   LO 3.2.1  

Rhyming words

  • Underline the rhyming words in the poem. You can use the same colour for words that have the same sound.
  • Look in the poem to find words which rhyme with these:

Word: ..............................................................................................................................

Luck: ..............................................................................................................................

Trees: ..............................................................................................................................

  • Find a word to end off this rhyme:

I always think it’s rather funny.

to stay inside when its .....................................................................................................

Try to think of your own rhyme:

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

Table 8
LO 3.2.2   LO 3.4.6   LO 4.2   LO 4.3.2  

st

  • Find the words beginning or ending with st.

“Stop,” said the stork. “ Stay and have a chat.”

“Can’t stop,” said the starling. “I can’t rest. I can’t stand about. I must get there first.”

“ But where are you going and why so fast? Just step over here and tell me please!”

But the starling still rushed on past. The best worms would be gone if she didn’t hurry.

  • Make a list of words ending in st and beginning with st.
  • Try to think of some other words to add to your list.

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

..........................................................................................................................................

.......................................................................................................................................... ..........................................................................................................................................

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Figure 6
Figure 6 (graphics6.png)

Table 9
LO 3.3.2   LO 3.4.3   LO 4.5.1   LO 4.5.2  

Assessment

Learning Outcome 1:LISTENING: The learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment and respond appropriately and critically in a wider range of situations.

Assessment Standard 1.3: We know this when the learner listens with enjoyment to oral texts (simple songs, rhymes, short poems and stories), and shows understanding:

1.3.6 expresses feelings about the oral text, giving reasons;

Learning Outcome 2:SPEAKING: The learner is able to communicate confidently and effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

Assessment Standard 2.5: We know this when the learner suggests ways of solving problems;

Learning Outcome 3:READING AND VIEWING: The learner is able to read and view for information and enjoyment and respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

Assessment Standard 3.1: We know this when the learner uses visual clues to make meaning:

3.1.3 predicts from the cover of a book what the story will be about;

Assessment Standard 3.2: We know this when the learner makes meaning of written text:

3.2.1 reads a story on own or with the teacher;

3.2.2 reads simple instructions in the classrooms;

Assessment Standard 3.3: We know this when the learner recognises and makes meaning of letters and words in longer texts:

3.3.2 reads aloud and uses correct pronunciation and appropriate stress;

3.3.3 uses phonic and other word recognition and comprehension skills such as phonics, context clues, and making predictions in order to make sense of text;

Assessment Standard 3.4: We know this when the learner develops phonic awareness:

3.4.3 recognises two-letter and three-letter consonant blends at the beginnings and ends of words;

3.4.6 recognises known rhymes;

Learning Outcome 4:WRITING: The learner is able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

Assessment Standard 4.1: We know this when the learner uses pre-writing strategies to initiate writing:

4.1.1 participates in group brainstorming activities to get ideas for writing;

4.1.2 shares ideas with classmates and teacher;

Assessment Standard 4.2: We know this when the learner writes for different purposes;

Assessment Standard 4.3: We know this when the learner revises writing:

4.3.2 makes attempts at editing own writing;

Assessment Standard 4.5: We know this when the learner builds vocabulary and starts to spell words so that they can be read and understood by others:

4.5.1 experiments with words drawn from own language experiences;

4.5.2 spells common words correctly;

Learning Outcome 5:THINKING AND REASONING: The learner is able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

Assessment Standard 5.2: We know this when the learner uses language to think and reason:

5.2.3 identifies similarities and differences, and classifies things.

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