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    By: Siyavula

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Drama: Warming-up

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 4

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PERFORMING

Module 21

DRAMA: WARMING UP

DRAMA

Before we start with our drama classes, you will have to be relaxed and warmed up. Ready? Good!

Activity 1

To perform relaxation and breathing exercises: the warm-up [LO 1.3]

  • Your educator will guide you through the following exercises and explain why you are doing them.

Relaxation 1:

  • Stand with your feet apart.
  • Reach upwards with your fingertips, palms facing and fingers splayed.
  • Try to touch the ceiling.
  • Imagine there is a wire attached to each fingertip and to the crown of your head.
  • You are being drawn up on to your toes towards the ceiling by the wires.
  • Feel the body elongate.
  • Hold this position for ten counts.
  • Imagine that the wires are suddenly cut.
  • Your hands, wrists, arms, head and shoulders will drop.
  • Let your arms hang loosely at your sides.
  • Let your head hang down.
  • Notice how easy and comfortable the muscles feel after the release of the tension.
  • Allow the head and arms to hang for a moment.
  • Then stand up straight.

Relaxation 2:

  • Stand with your feet apart.
  • Thrust your splayed fingertips and the crown of your head rhythmically at the ceiling.
  • After five thrusts, hold the position. Strain upwards for a further count of ten.
  • Let the whole body above the waist relax. Slump forward.
  • The trunk, arms, hands and head must hang down in a relaxed easy manner.
  • Allow the arms to dangle loosely until they come to a halt of their own accord.
  • Hang limp for a few moments.
  • Adjust your legs.
  • Slowly stand up straight.

Posture 1:

  • Stand with your heels a few inches away from the wall.
  • Rest your back against the wall.
  • Allow arms to hang loosely.
  • Feel that the head is poised, with your chin level.
  • Bend your knees and allow your body to lower itself.
  • Feel the spinal area in the lumbar region straighten and contact the wall.
  • Slide up and down the wall a few times.
  • Feel your spine straightening as you lower your body.

Posture 2:

  • Stand up straight, with feet apart.
  • Reach out sideways with your hands as far as possible.
  • Splay your fingers, palms to the ground, thumbs pointing forwards.
  • Turn the palms upwards so that the thumbs are pointing to the back.
  • Feel the shoulders rolled back as you twist your hands round as far as you can.
  • Continue to stretch outwards.
  • Slowly lower your arms and try to touch your thighs with the backs of the fingers.
  • Feel the lower part of the chest expand as the arms lower.
  • Do not poke your head forward.
  • This is a good corrective exercise for rounded shoulders.

Breathing:

  • Lie on the floor with your arms slightly away from your body – hands loose.
  • Draw your knees up until the soles of your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Place your hands gently on the lower side of the ribs.
  • Breathe in slowly through your nose and out through your mouth.
  • Become aware of the movement your rib-cage is making.
  • Pant like a dog – in and out, rapidly.
  • Become aware of the power you can exert over your breath if you wish.
  • Breathe in through your nose to a count of five – hold for a moment – allow it to flow out silently from a wide open jaw for a count of five.
  • All movements must be in the lower part of the chest.

Warm-up 1: Red, Blue, Yellow

  • Sit on a chair in a circle with a space between each chair.
  • Your educator will give each of you in the circle a colour – alternating red and blue.
  • The purpose of this exercise is precise movement, with no fuss and in complete SILENCE.
  • On the order ‘RED’, all the reds must rise and find another chair.
  • On the order ‘BLUE’, all the blues have to find another chair.
  • On the order ‘YELLOW’, everyone finds another chair.
  • Vary the movement from slow motion to fast reaction.
  • No contact may be made.

Warm-up 2:

  • The whole group should jog about in a space.
  • Your educator will have a whistle.
  • When the educator blows the whistle, everyone must freeze.
  • The educator will point to a ‘victim’.
  • The ‘victim’ instantly acquires his own extraordinary movement routine and leaps into action.
  • All in the group are affected in the same way.
  • After 10 seconds, the educator will blow the whistle again.
  • Everyone freezes.
  • Another ‘victim’ is pointed out.

Assessment

LEARNING OUTCOME 1: CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTINGThe learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner:

1.3 performs simple teacher-directed relaxation and breathing exercises when warming up and cooling down.

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