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    By: Siyavula

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Dance: The ball dance

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ARTS AND CULTURE

Grade 4

CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PERFORMING

Module 24

DANCE: THE BALL DANCE

THE BALL DANCE, COOLING DOWN AND STRETCHING

Activity 1

To use props in creating dance: the ball dance [LO 1.2]

After the warm-up, you can now begin to demonstrate the movement of the whole body. There are five basic body activities:

  • travel (moving from one place to another);
  • turn (to move around an axis);
  • elevation (to move to a higher level);
  • gesture (motion of the hands, head or body to express or emphasise an idea or emotion);
  • weight transference (to change body weight from one point to another);
  • keep these principles in mind when conducting the next exercise.

Homework

  • Bring a ball to the class.
  • Experiment at home with different movements which you can create by using a ball.
  • Select a piece of music to accompany your dance – look for songs with “ball”, “bounce”, “jump”, etc. in them.

Helpful hints for creating your dance:

  • hold the ball in both hands;
  • walk, run, travel, turn, jump with the ball;
  • lift and lower the ball on different levels (high, middle, low) while moving;
  • combine arm movements with the ball, with the travelling movements;
  • hold the ball in one hand while executing movements;
  • throw and catch the ball while moving;
  • place the ball on the floor and move around it;
  • put your foot on the ball;
  • select movements from your experimentation exercise and put them together to create a short dance with the ball sequence;
  • be creative! – try to think of interesting movements to do with your ball and dance movements;
  • practise and perform your dance for the rest of the class.

Activity 2

To cool down and stretch the body after executing the exercises [LO 1.1]

It is important that you stretch your muscles after the exercise If you do not stretch after the class, you will feel stiff and sore the next day.

Breathing exercise:

  • Stand with feet a hip-width apart, arms hanging at the sides.
  • Inhale through the nose, raising arms above the head.
  • Exhale through the mouth, dropping arms and bending knees at the same time.
  • Repeat 4 times.

Neck stretch:

  • Raise right arm straight up, put arm over head, touch the left side of the head.
  • Slowly pull the head to the right towards the shoulder and drop the left shoulder.
  • Repeat on left side.
Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

Arm stretch: take the right arm across the chest and with the left hand slowly pull arm towards the body – repeat on left side.

Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)

Back stretch: bend knees, knees and feet facing forwards – lean forwards and place hands on knees – contract back upwards (like a cat) and release – repeat four times.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

Body stretch:

  • Stand with feet a hip-width apart – knees slightly bent – arms hanging down at the sides.
  • Reach up towards the ceiling with your arms – stretching your body upwards.
  • Stand on your toes while stretching upwards towards the ceiling.
  • Release to crouching position in a low level.
  • Repeat four times.
Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

Hamstring and calve stretch:

  • Keep hands on the floor.
  • Straighten legs.
  • Keep upper body bent forward – head down.
  • Hold stretch for eight counts.

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

Recovery:

  • Slowly curl up – head coming up last.
  • Shake all moveable body parts.
  • Bow to your educator to say “thank you” for the class.

Assessment

LEARNING OUTCOME 1: CREATING, INTERPRETING AND PRESENTINGThe learner will be able to create, interpret and present work in each of the art forms.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner:

1.1 in preparing the body, follows a teacher-directed warm-up and skill-developing ritual, with attention to safe use of the body, for example:

- knees aligned over toes when bending;

- articulation (toe-heel-bend) of the feet and bending knees when landing from jumps;

- good posture at all times.

1.2 uses cans, stones, newspapers, materials, chairs, balls and a large variety of objects/props to improvise and compose movement sequences.

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