Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax_CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Life Orientation Grade 4 » We learn while playing

Navigation

Lenses

What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

This content is ...

In these lenses

  • GETIntPhaseLO display tagshide tags

    This module and collection are included inLens: Siyavula: Life Orientation (Gr. 4-6)
    By: Siyavula

    Module Review Status: In Review
    Collection Review Status: In Review

    Click the "GETIntPhaseLO" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.

Tags

(What is a tag?)

These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

We learn while playing

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

LIFE ORIENTATION

Grade 4

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND MOVEMENT

Module 15

WE LEARN WHILE PLAYING

GYMNASTIC EXERCISES FOR BODY CONTROL

Activity 1

To do exercises for body control [LO 4.2]

Locomote: The carnival of the animals

Material: Cassette and CD player with music. (The Carnival of the Animals by the composer Saint-Saëns is a good choice.)

When the music starts to play the learners imitate the movements of certain animals.

As soon as the music stops the learners must “freeze” until the music resumes.

Each time that the music starts up again, the learner has to imitate a different animal.

Examples of animals and their movements:

The bear: crawling on all fours.

Trotting horses: the knees are lifted high.

Frog jumping: hop from haunches to arms.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

Flying birds: run about flapping the arms.

Rabbit hop: hop about on haunches without touching the ground with the hands.

Learners can be encouraged to create their own animals and movements.

At the end of the exercise the learners or the educator can select the learner who made the most interesting animal movements.

Activity 2

To play a roundabout game [LO 4.2]

Rotate: Roundabout game

Material: Cassette and CD player with music. Any cheerful rhythmical music is suitable. Examples of slow and fast music can be alternated.

  • Learners make a wide circle – at least an arms’ length between two learners.
  • When the music starts to play the educator calls out one learner’s name.
  • The learner must immediately perform a rotating movement.
  • All the other learners must imitate the movement. Moving non-stop on one spot is also allowed.
  • The group must move to the other side whenever the music stops. It is important to keep the circle intact.

Examples of rotation motion:

  • The windmill: Swing the arms up and down whilst turning all the time.
  • The top: Spin rapidly.
  • The rocking horse: Lie on your stomach. Clasp the ankles with the hands so that your back is bent (you are like a boat) and sway backwards and forwards.
Figure 2
Figure 2 (graphics2.png)
  • The cradle: Sit with your knees bent and clasp your legs tightly with both arms. Sway forwards and backwards as far as possible.

Encourage creative movements but stop uncontrolled wild movements that can cause injuries immediately.

Activity 2

To perform circus stunts [LO 4.2]

Elevate: Circus stunts/positions

  • Divide the learners into pairs.
  • Learners are given three minutes to work out a circus position.
  • During the stunt neither of the two learners may touch the ground with any part of the body.
  • Learners must create a name for their position.
  • After three minutes each pair is given a chance to demonstrate their position/stunt to the rest of the class. The class then votes for the best/funniest/most interesting position or stunt.

Examples of circus stunts/positions:

The double crab position: Learner A stands on all fours in an inverted position (i.e. with the abdomen facing the sky) and learner B stands in the same position but with his/her feet on learner A’s knees and his/her hands on B’s shoulders.

Figure 3
Figure 3 (graphics3.png)

The double-decker bus position: Learner A stands on the ground on all fours and learner B on all fours with his/her knees on A’s back and his/her hands on learner A’s shoulders.

Figure 4
Figure 4 (graphics4.png)

The helicopter position: Learner A lies on his back with his/her legs in the air. Learner B lies with his/her abdomen on learner A’s feet while stretching the body and with arms pointing forwards.

Figure 5
Figure 5 (graphics5.png)

Activity 3

To perform balancing acts [LO 4.2]

Balance: Pyramids

  • Learners are divided into groups of 3 - 5.
  • Learners must think of a pyramid position in which balancing plays an important part.
  • Groups are allowed five minutes to plan and execute a position.
  • Each group has a chance to display their pyramid.
  • Marks out of ten can be allocated by the learners or the teacher.

Examples of possible pyramid positions:

  • Two learners stand on all fours with the soles of their feet touching. The third learner balances by standing with one foot on the backs of each of the other two learners, and stretching his/her arms towards the sky.
  • Five learners balance in a fanned out position with their feet touching. Learners one and five touch the ground with one hand. The group form a “protractor” with the ground.
Figure 6
Figure 6 (graphics6.png)
Figure 7
Figure 7 (graphics7.png)

Assessment

LEARNING OUTCOME 4: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT AND MOVEMENT

The learner will be able to demonstrate an understanding of, and participate in, activities that promote movement and physical development.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner

4.2 demonstrates different ways to locomote, rotate, elevate and balance, using various parts of the body, with control.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks