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References

Module by: CU Science Education Intiative, UBC Carl Weiman Science Education Initiative. E-mail the authors

Summary: This module contains general and cited references in the Clicker Resource Guide.

General References

E. Ribbens, Case Study: Why I like clicker personal response systems, J. of Coll. Sci. Teaching, pg 60, Nov. 2007.

Duncan, D., 2005. Clickers in the classroom: how to enhance science teaching using classroom response systems, San Francisco: Addison Wesley and Benjamin Cummings.

more references and other resources at: http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/clickers.htm

For an electronic copy of this Guide, plus information and resources – including videos of clickers in action – please visit: STEMclickers.colorado.edu  

References

  1. Beatty, I.D and Gerace, W.J. and Leonard, W.J. and Dufresne, R.J. (2006). Designing effective questions for classroom response system teaching. American Journal of Physics, 74(1), 31-39.
  2. Bransford, J. and Brown, A. and Cocking, R. (Eds.). (2000). How People Learn; Brain, Mind, Experience, and School. [Expanded edition.]. NAS Press.
  3. Crouch, C.H. and Watkins, J. and Fagen, A.P. and Mazur, E. (2007). Peer Instruction: Engaging Students One-on-One, All At Once. Research-Based Reform of University Physics, 1(1),
  4. Freeman, S. and others. (2007). Prescribed Active Learning Increases Performance in Introductory Biology. CBE Life Sci Educ., 6(2), 132-9.
  5. Hake, R.R. (1998). Interactive-engagement versus traditional methods: A six-thousand-student survey of mechanics test data for introductory physics courses. American Journal of Physics, 66(1), 64.
  6. James, M.C. (2006). The effect of grading incentive on student discourse in Peer Instruction. American Journal of Physics, 74(8), 689-91.
  7. Knight, J.K. and Wood, W.B. (2005). Teaching more by lecturing less. Cell Biol. Educ., 4, 298-310.
  8. Mazur, E. (1997). Peer Instruction: A User’s Manual. Prentice Hall.
  9. Redish, E.F. (2003). Teaching Physicswith Physics Suite. John Wiley & Sons.
  10. Schwartz, D. and Bransford, J. (1998). A time for telling. Cognition and Instruction, 16, 475.
  11. [Poster available from http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/papers.htm].

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