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Story-telling

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 5

WINGS

Module 3

STORY-TELLING

ACTIVITY 1

TO SUGGEST AN ALTERNATIVE ENDING FOR THE STORY [LO 1.1.5]

TO RETELL INFORMATION / A STORY [LO 1.1.6]

TO RECOUNT AN EVENT WITH SUPPORT [LO 1.4.2]

TO LISTEN TO OTHERS AND ENCOURAGE THEIR ATTEMPTS TO SPEAK AN ADDITONAL LANGUAGE [ LO 1.5.2]

TO UNDERSTAND THE MORAL OF A STORY [3.1.2]

TO READ FOR PLEASURE – NON-FICTION AT AN APPROPRIATE READING AND LANGUAGE LEVEL [ 3.6.1]

Find information on at least one more tourist attraction anywhere in our country. Read about it. Paste your information on the back of this page.

Make sure that you know the contents well.

Turn to your partner and retell what you have read.

Listen to your partner retell what you have told him/her, to you.

Which one of you was most accurate in re-telling the information?

OR

Find a story/fable/folktale about something that can fly. Think wide: birds, ‘planes, space ships, hot air balloons – even rocket-propelled people – can fly. Make sure that you know what you have read, then turn and tell your partner the story. Listen to your partner telling the story (-ies) he has read.

NOW

Retell one of the following stories to your classmates.

(1)

Who is the Best ?

(an East African fable)

One day the animals were quarrelling about who was the best animal.

“I am,” roared the lion, “for I am the most feared. Everyone is terrified of me.”

“No, I am,” trumpeted the elephant, “because I am the biggest!”

“No, I am,” hissed the snake, “for I am the deadliest. No-one will survive my poison.”

“Am I not the one who flies the highest ?” cried the eagle.

This argument went on for a long time, each one claiming to be very important. The cheetah claimed that he was the fastest creature, the giraffe insisted that he was the tallest, the python stated that he was the longest, and the sheep was adamant that he was the most patient.

Finally they agreed to call Man and let him be the judge. Man came and said, “The best of all the animals is the cow because she is the most useful to me!”

(2)

The Bees and the Tortoise

(a fable from Mali)

The bees had made a new drum, and as bees love dancing, they danced and hummed for hours in celebration on that day. All the animals heard the noise coming from the hive and they came along, hoping to be invited to join in, but the bees kept their celebration all to themselves. The lion, the elephant, the leopard, the hartebeest, the buffalo, the antelope, the hog and even the tortoise were there.

After listening for a while, the animals grew so fond of the sound of the new drum that they decided to steal it. First the lion tried but he was stung by a hundred bees and had to run away. All the animals tried to steal the drum but none of them succeeded.

Then, at last, the tortoise offered to try. All the animals laughed heartily at this, but the tortoise went into the hive and told the bees that he was a master drummer. He played beautifully after the bees had given him permission to drum for a little while. Suddenly the drum disappeared! The clever tortoise had hidden it underneath his shell. He excused himself and walked away quietly. The bees were so angry that they tried to sting him, but to no avail – he was too well protected by his shell. That is why he had the confidence to try when everyone else had failed.

(Stories taken from Fables from Africa, collected by Jan Knappert)

Discussion

  • What is the moral in each of these stories? What is the lesson that we can learn from each tale?
  • How can we apply this lesson to our own lives?
  • Suggest a different ending for one of the stories. Tell the rest of the class.

ACTIVITY 2

TO READ FOR PLEASURE NON-FICTION AT AN APPROPRIATE READING AND LEVEL

[LO 3.6.1]

It takes practice to read fluently.

When you were very small and just learning to ride your bike, it took time andendless practice before you could ride with confidence.Reading is no different. You will need to practise your piece over and over again,making sure you know how to pronounce challenging words and even know theirmeanings, before you can read confidently and fluently.

TASK:

Prepare a piece of reading of your own choiceto read to the class and to your teacher.Choose some interesting dialogue in an interesting passageand practise using different voices.

ACTIVITY 3

TO UNDERSTAND SOME ELEMENTS OF POETRY:

RHYME; WORDS BEGINNING WITH THE SAME SOUND; IMITATION OF

SOUNDS [LO 3.2.1; 3.2.2; 3.2.3]

TO WRITE CREATIVELY [LO 4.3.3]

Some people believe that poems need to be learnt or that you have to read them seriously … but poems can be fun, too!

Do you still remember this nursery rhyme?

Can you sing it?

SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE

Sing a song of sixpence,

A pocket full of rye;

Four and twenty blackbirds,

Baked in a pie.

When the pie was opened,

The birds began to sing;

Was that not a dainty dish,

To put before the King?

(Taken from Traditional Nursery Rhymes, Brown Wells and Jacobs, 1985)

Points to ponder:

Which words rhyme with each other?

Are there words in the same line, or lines which follow each other, starting with the same sound?

Who would read this poem with enjoyment (the target audience)?

How many other poems about flying creatures can you find? Bring them along to class so that we can enjoy them together. Read your poem as well as you can – with expression!

Glue your example here or write it out neatly.

ACROSTIC POEMS

Now, try to write your own poem!

Choose a word. Write the letters vertically on your page. Write a word next to each letter, describing your topic. Look at the example.

Table 1
R oaring   Try this one
O ut to space   W  
C arrot-shaped   I  
K ickstarted   N  
E verlasting darkness   G  
T o discover !   S  

And this one:

Table 2
V  
U  
L  
T  
U  
R  
E  

Now try some of your own. Choose any of the following:

astronaut ; balloon ; butterfly ; owl ; eagle ; train (or any other).

(1) (2)

I enjoyed this task. Why?

I did not enjoy this task. Why not?

ACTIVITY 4

TO RESPECT OTHER LEARNERS, GIVE THEM A CHANCE TO SPEAK AND ENCOURAGE THEIR ATTEMPT SO SPEAK THEIR ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE [LO 1.5.1; 1.5.2]

TO ASK AND ANSWER QUESTIONS IN THE ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

[LO 2.1.1]

TO EXPRESS AN OPINION AND GIVE A REASON FOR IT [LO 2.1.3]

Help !

I’m in desperate need of a change of scenery … !

Where to go … ?

Obtain a few brochures from your local travel agent. Study these brochures in your groups and discuss the following.

  1. What does the brochure look like? How have they used lettering, colour and layout to attract the reader’s attention?
  2. Who is their target reader? Think about the person’s age, interests, income, etc. How do you know (from studying the brochure) who they are hoping to attract to this venue or resort?
  3. What kind of language do they use in their brochure? Formal? Informal? Why?
  4. What is the purpose of this brochure? What is the purpose of the information they are supplying to the reader?
  5. In your opinion, what makes this place appealing to you? Why would you want to go and holiday there?
  6. Choose someone in your group to give feedback to the rest of the class.
Table 3
CHECKLIST(to be completed by the group members)Tick the appropriate column
We studied the brochure in detail, noting the use of lettering, colour and layout. We made notes on our findings. yes no
We made decisions as to who the target reader would be. yes no
We discussed the type of language used in the brochure and made notes. yes no
We discussed the type of information given in the brochure and we made notes for further reference. yes no
We will be using some of the notes in the following tasks. yes no
We remembered to speak English most of the time. yes no
We listened to each other and gave members of the group chance to speak without interruption. yes no

Notes :

Design your own brochure

ACTIVITY 5

TO WRITE A SHORT DESCRIPTION OF A PLACE [LO 4.1.5]

TO EXPRESS AN OPINION IN WRITING AND GIVE REASONS [LO 4.1.6]

TO DESIGN A BROCHURE, INCORPORATING MEDIA (PICTURES) AND TEXT [LO 4.4.1]

TO WRITE A ROUGH DRAFT [LO 4.5.1]

TO GET FEEDBACK FROM A CLASSMATE [4.5.3]

TO REWRITE THE DRAFT AFTER FEEDBACK [LO 4.5.4]

TO SPELL FAMILIAR WORDS CORRECTLY [LO 4.5.5]

TO USE A WIDE RANGE OF PUNCTUATION [LO 4.5.6]

  1. You may choose to work on your own or in groups of two.
  2. Select a destination or a tourist attraction to be the topic of your brochure.
  3. Ask questions to be answered in your brochure (such as: where it is; how to get there ; what the costs involved are; what there is to see; give contact numbers / address; and any other information that you may have gleaned from studying the brochures).
  4. Use an A4 size sheet of blank paper for you brochure – write all the information by hand and draw the sketches, pictures and ‘photographs’ yourself. No photostat copies are allowed. You may fold the paper into halves, quarters, lengthwise, into triangles – in any way you wish.
  5. Complete all your work in class. No work may be done at home. Your teacher will tell you in advance how much time you will be given to work on this project in the class.
  6. Share the workload. When you have finished this task, attach it to the top of this page.

Use this space for your ideas and notes.

Use this space for your final draft. After your writing effort has been edited and checked by a friend, write your final draft as per instructions.

Assessment

LO 1

LISTENINGThe learner will be able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

1.1 understands stories (told or read to learners):

1.1.1 answers literal questions;

1.1.2 responds personally;

1.1.5 suggests an alternative ending for the story;

1.1.6 retells the story;

1.1.7 summarises the story with support;

1.4 understands recounted events:

1.4.2 recounts the same events with support;

1.5 respects other learners:

1.5.1 gives other learners a chance to speak;

1.5.2 listens to them and encourages their attempts to speak their additional language.

LO 2

SPEAKINGThe learner will be able to communicate effectively in spoken language in a wide range of situations.

We know this when the learner:

2.1 interacts in additional language:

2.1.1 asks and answers questions;

2.1.3 expresses an opinion and gives a reason for it;

2.3 uses additional language to communicate information:

2.3.5 talks about a familiar topic with preparation.

LO 3

READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 understands in a simple way some element of stories:

3.1.2 the moral of a story, where appropriate;

3.2 understands, in a simple way, some elements of poetry:

3.2.1 rhyme;

3.2.2 words which begin with the same sound;

3.2.3 words which imitate their sound;

3.3 reads for information.

3.6 reads for pleasure:

3.6.1 reads fiction and non-fiction at an appropriate reading and language level;

3.6.4 solves word puzzles;

3.7 uses reference books and develops vocabulary:

3.7.1 uses a dictionary.

LO 4

WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

We know this when the learner:

4.1 writes to communicate information:

4.1.5 writes a short description of a person, object or simple process;

4.1.6 expresses an opinion in writing and gives a reason for it;

4.3 writes creatively:

4.3.3 uses some techniques for creative writing: repeating the same structure to create a poetic rhythm and pattern;

4.4 designs media texts:

4.4.1 designs a simple poster and/or notice;

4.5 treats writing as a process, and uses developing knowledge or language structure and use:

4.5.1 writes rough drafts;

4.5.3 gets feedback from the teacher and classmates;

4.5.4 rewrites after feedback;

4.5.5 begins to understand differences in writing style;

4.5.6 spells familiar words correctly;

4.5.7 uses a wider range of punctuation.

Memorandum

Reading and speaking

  • Here again, impress upon the learners to find information on at least one more tourist attraction anywhere in our country. The research is the basis for the task and needs to be done well.
  • Do not rush this task. The learners need to read their information with concentration, in order to re-tell it successfully. If they struggle with this task, do it over – until they have mastered the skill.
  • The two African stories : Allow the learners to lead in the following discussion. You may find that there is more than one interpretation of the story.

Discussion

  • What is the moral in each of these stories? What is the lesson that we can learn from each tale?
  • How can we apply this lesson to our own lives?
  • Suggest a different ending for one of the stories. Tell the rest of the class.

Reading

  • It takes practice to read fluently. Impress upon the learners to practise and to pay attention to pronunciation of difficult words and fluency of the piece of reading.

Poems

ACTIVITY 3

Points to ponder: discuss the following with the learners (Use other examples as well – those which the learners bring to school)

  • Which words rhyme with each other?
  • Are there words in the same line, or lines which follow each other, starting with the same sound?
  • Who would read this poem with enjoyment (the target audience)?

Acrostic poems are fun to do. Allow the learners to select their best poem and to rewrite it onto newsprint. Display these poems on the pinboards or display them in the corridors for others to read.

Allow the learners to choose their own topics if they wish.

ACTIVITY 4

Once again, the research is important. Use the samples brought by the learners in the discussion re layout. (see points 1 – 6)

The Brochure

Very clear instructions are listed for the learners to note.

Follow the guidelines laid down for written work. Ensure that the learner’s mind-map their ideas, put these ideas into sentences and paragraphs, write a rough draft which is edited – before writing a final draft. Use the space provided in the module. If this is not sufficient, allow the learners to work on blank paper or lined folio. Include this into the module.

ACTIVITY 5

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