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Scripts, poetry, interviews

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH FIRST ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

Grade 5

Module 14

SCRIPTS; POETRY; INTERVIEWS

ACTIVITY 1

TO WRITE A CREATIVE SCRIPT FOR A DIALOGUE [LO 4.3.1]

TO EXPRESS OPINIONS AND EXPRESS REASONS FOR THEM [LO 5.2.8]

Study the cartoon - what do you think happens in this tale? Why is it funny? Dramatise the story in your groups, before filling in the speech bubbles.

Figure 1
Figure 1 (graphics1.png)

ACTIVITY 2

TO UNDERSTAND, IN A SIMPLE WAY, SOME OF THE ELEMENTS OF POETRY

RHYME [LO 3.2.1]

WORDS WHICH BEGIN WITH THE SAME SOUND [ LO 3.2.2]

Your educator will help you with this task.

We all know tongue twisters! Have fun with tongue twisters by seeing how quickly they can be read or said – without getting confused.

Betty Botta bought some butter.

“But,” said she, “this butter’s bitter!

If I put it in my batter,

It will make my batter bitter.

But a bit o’ better butter

Will but make my batter better.”

So she bought a bit o’ butter

Better than the bitter butter,

Made her bitter batter better.

So ‘twas better Bettty Botta

Bought a bit o’ better butter.

A flea and a fly in a flue

Were caught, so what could they do?

Said the fly, “Let us flee.”

“Let us fly,” said the flea.

So they flew through a flaw in the flue.

(Source unknown)

ACTIVITY 3

TO RESPECT OTHER LEARNERS, GIVE OTHER LEARNERS A CHANCE TO SPEAK, LISTEN TO THEM AND ENCOURAGE THEIR ATTEMPTS TO SPEAK THEIR ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE [LO 1.5]

TO INTERACT IN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE AND EXPRESSES OPINIONS AND FEELINGS [L.O.2.1]

TO ANSWER MORE COMPLEX QUESTIONS [LO 5.2.1]

Finding out!

Interviewing

How to interview someone successfully …

An interviewer needs to ask questions that do not require a yes or a no answer only. When interviewing somebody, your questions should encourage the person to give detailed answers or more information.

The following types of questions can help you when you plan your interview.

Select those that you would like to use and complete the questions. Can you add any of your own to the list?

What happened when ___?

Can you remember when ___?

Where were you___?

Describe your feelings ____?

Why did you ____ ?

What do you think will ___?

What about ____?

Please tell our listeners exactly ____ .

Assessment

LO 3

READING AND VIEWINGThe learner will be able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

We know this when the learner:

3.1 understands in a simple way some element of stories:

3.1.4 notices the role that visual images (pictures, photographs) play in the construction of meaning (e.g. how old and young people are represented in pictures);

3.2 understands, in a simple way, some elements of poetry:

3.2.1 rhyme;

3.2.2 words which begin with the same sound;

3.6 reads for pleasure:

3.6.1 reads fiction and non-fiction at an appropriate reading and language level;

3.6.4 solves word puzzles;

3.7 uses reference books and develops vocabulary:

3.7.1 uses a dictionary;

3.7.2 demonstrates a reading vocabulary of between 2 000 and 3 500 common words.

LO 4

WRITINGThe learner will be able to write different kinds of factual and imaginative texts for a wide range of purposes.

We know this when the learner:

4.3 writes creatively:

4.3.1 writes a play script or dialogue;

4.5 treats writing as a process, and uses developing knowledge or language structure and use:

4.5.1 writes rough drafts;

4.5.6 spells familiar words correctly;

4.5.7 uses a wider range of punctuation (e.g. inverted commas).

LO 5

THINKING AND REASONINGThe learner will able to use language to think and reason, and access, process and use information for learning.

We know this when the learner:

5.2 uses language for thinking:

5.2.4 classifies things according to criteria;

5.2.5 identifies similarities and differences between things;

5.2.6 distinguishes parts from the whole;

5.2.8 expresses opinions and gives reasons for them.

Memorandum

ACTIVITY 1

Treat writing as a process, and use developing knowledge of language structure and use.

Learner must write a script, dramatise it and then perhaps fill in the bubbles properly. Let them write down the speech in PENCIL first.

Let them know that when writing dialogue, they need to leave a space open between speakers AND that a new speaker requires a new line. This is different from writing in bubbles, where punctuation should really be correct and interesting.

Ask them to avoid slang and contractions if possible. This will make a difference to the finished product!

ACTIVITY 2

We all know these tongue twisters! Have fun with tongue twisters by seeing how quickly they can be read/said – without getting confused! They are found in the learners’ module.

Discuss with the learners

  • what makes this kind of poetry unique
  • the style of this kind of poetry
  • rhyme
  • alliteration

Encourage the learners to find other tongue twisters and to bring them to class to read or recite. This kind of poem lends itself to lots of fun – and ultimately the pupils will enjoy poetry. Groups of learners, reciting or reading tongue twisters, can compete against each other.

Encourage the learners to display their choices on the pinboard, or allow them to paste their tongue twister onto an extra page in their unit of work.

Poetry is for enjoyment. Keep this in mind at all times.

ACTIVITY 3

Finding out about interviewing:

Now give them the instructions:

Work with a partner.

One of you is the interviewer and must interview the other.

You may select topics of your own.

Use current news stories.

You may only use 1 prop each.

Allow the learners to complete the checklist below, before presenting their interview to the rest of the class.

Remember that it is never easy interviewing someone. It is a skill that needs to be practised. Allow the learners to practise in class – so that you can help if necessary. It is simple if you allow half the class to practise at one time (a bit noisy!) while the other half of the class ‘ tutors’ them.

The following checklist can be put up on newsprint, on the chalkboard or even handed out to the learners, before the time. This serves as a guide while they are working in their groups.

Checklist

Table 1
1. The questions lead to informative answers. Yes No
2. The interviewer spoke clearly and audibly. Yes No
3. Enough time was given to answer properly. Yes No
4. The topic was interesting and newsworthy. Yes No
5. The interviewer introduced the guest. Yes No
6. This was an enjoyable task. Yes No

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