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The lion and the mouse

Module by: Siyavula Uploaders. E-mail the author

ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE

Grade 4

BOOKS, FOR THE MIND

Module 1

THE LION AND THE MOUSE

Activity 1

To know the meaning of words such as author, characters, theme and storyline [LO1.2]

EDUCATOR: Choose a well-loved story that is known to your class and read it to them. This may be from a previous class reader or a popular library book. There needs to be more than two main characters and a straightforward storyline.

The dramatic reading of this story should be between three and four minutes long. Use this as a demonstration of how to create atmosphere and captivate an audience with your voice.

LEARNERS: You will probably have heard or read this story before. Now you need to listen very well while you enjoy hearing it again. You will be expected to answer some questions immediately after having listened to your teacher reading the story to you.

Just to be sure that you are not caught napping, let’s check your vocabulary. Do you know what is meant by each of the following? Decide with the help of your group.

  • Author
  • Main characters
  • Theme
  • Storyline

Don’t waste any time! Grab your pencil and complete the table on the following page while the information is still fresh in your memory. Be neat and precise.

Author……………………………………………………………………………….

Main characters…………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………………………

Theme ……………………………………………………………………………….

Storyline ……………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

…………………………………………………………………………………………

Activity 2

To enjoy listening to a story [LO 1.1]

EDUCATOR: Read a short Aesop’s Fable to the class and end off with the moral. Read the whole story once more.

LEARNERS: Listen attentively to the short story and then complete the piece below by filling in the missing words. The more carefully you listen, the easier it will be to decide on the missing words. Remember, be ready to start the exercise the moment your teacher gives you the signal.

THE LION AND THE MOUSE

A lion was sleeping in his …….…………… . A ………………….. ran into the

den. It ran up onto the lion’s head and sat on its …………….……………….. .

The lion woke up. It was very ………………………... It grabbed the mouse

in its mighty………………………... How dare you wake me up! I’ll

……………………….. you for this!” roared the lion.

The mouse was very ………………………... It said, “Please don’t eat me.

Please let me go. I did not mean to wake you up. If

you let me go, who knows, maybe one day I will be able to

……………………….. you.”

When the lion heard this, it laughed. It thought it was a great

………………………... How could a skinny little mouse help the

……………………….. of Beasts? But he let the little mouse go

………………….., and the mouse ran as fast as it could out of the den.

A few days later, the mouse was out looking for ………………………... It

came upon the lion caught up in a big …………… . The net was a trap, set

by ………………………... The lion struggled to get free. But the more it

struggled, the ………………….………….. the net became.

“Lie still,” said the mouse to the lion.

Then the mouse bit a small hole in the net with its sharp

………………………... The mouse chewed and chewed and chewed. Soon

the small hole was ……………….. enough for the lion to put its paw through.

Soon the lion had two paws free. The mouse kept chewing and chewing at

the net, and soon the lion was free from the ……………………….. .

“There,” said the mouse, “that’s how a little mouse can

……………………….. a great lion.”

MORAL: ONE ………..……….. TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

NOW LISTEN ATTENTIVELY

A lion was sleeping in his den. A mouse ran into the den. It ran up onto the lion’s head and sat on its paw. The lion woke up. It was very angry. It grabbed the mouse in its mighty paw.

“How dare you wake me up? I’ll kill you for this!” roared the lion.

The mouse was very scared. It said, “Please don’t eat me. Please let me go. I did not mean to wake you up. If you let me go, who knows, maybe one day I will be able to help you.”

When the lion heard this, it laughed. It thought it was a great joke. How could a skinny little mouse help the King of Beasts? But he let the little mouse go free, and the mouse ran as fast as it could out of the den.

A few days later, the mouse was out looking for food. It came upon the lion caught up in a big net. The net was a trap, set by hunters. The lion struggled to get free. But the more it struggled, the tighter the net became.

“Lie still,” said the mouse to the lion.

Then the mouse bit a small hole in the net with its sharp teeth. The mouse chewed and chewed and chewed. Soon the small hole was big enough for the lion to put its paw through. Soon the lion had two paws free. The mouse kept chewing and chewing at the net, and soon the lion was free from the trap.

“There,” said the mouse, “that’s how a little mouse can help a great lion.”

MORAL: ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

Activity 3

To show understanding of what has been read [LO 3.5]

LEARNERS: Now that you have the original version, check the words that you chose to fill the blank spaces with the ones used here. Then take a look at the five summaries of the story below. Only one is correct. Identify the correct one by highlighting it.

1. The story is about a mouse that proved he was as strong as a stupid lion.

2. The story is about a cunning lion that promised to help a mouse, but did not.

3. The story is about a clever mouse that helped some hunters trap a lion.

4. The story is about a clever mouse that helps a lion to get out of a trap.

5. The story is about a clever mouse that gets his own back on a cruel lion.

Assessment

LEARNING OUTCOME 1: LISTENINGThe learner is able to listen for information and enjoyment, and respond appropriately and critically in a wider range of situations.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner:

1.1 enjoys listening to different kinds of oral texts and responds appropriately (e.g. stories, fables, limericks, short reports);

1.2 discusses the central idea and specific details of the text and relates them to own experience.

LEARNING OUTCOME 3: READING AND VIEWINGThe learner is able to read and view for information and enjoyment, and to respond critically to the aesthetic, cultural and emotional values in texts.

Assessment Standard

We know this when the learner:

3.5 shows understanding and identifies and discusses aspects such as central idea, characters, setting and plot in fiction texts.

Memorandum

Activity 1

Table 1
Author Arthur Rackham (this version)
Main characters Cinderella, Prince, stepmother, 3 ugly sisters, Fairy godmother
Theme Love story
Storyline Cinderella goes to the palace ball and meets the prince. At midnight she runs home, but loses her slipper. The prince finally finds her and they marry.
This is an OPEN MEMO. If Cinderella was chosen, the answers are as shown above.

Activity 2

THE LION AND THE MOUSE

A lion was sleeping in his den. A mouse ran into the den. It ran up onto the lion’s head and sat on its paw.

The lion woke up. It was very angry. It grabbed the mouse in its mighty paw.

“How dare you wake me up! I’ll kill you for this!” roared the lion.

The mouse was very scared. It said: “Please don’t eat me. Please let me go. I did not mean to wake you up. If you let me go, who knows, maybe one day I will be able to help you.”

When the lion heard this, it laughed. It thought it was a great joke. How could a skinny little mouse help the King of Beasts? But he let the little mouse go free, and the mouse ran as fast as it could out of the den.

A few days later, the mouse was out looking for food. It came upon the lion caught up in a big net. The net was a trap, set by hunters. The lion struggled to get free. But the more it struggled, the tighter the net became.

“Lie still,” said the mouse to the lion.

Then the mouse bit a small hole in the net with its sharp teeth. The mouse chewed and chewed and chewed. Soon the small hole was big enough for the lion to put its paw through. Soon the lion had two paws free. The mouse kept chewing and chewing at the net, and soon the lion was free from the trap.

“There,” said the mouse, “that’s how a little mouse can help a great lion.”

MORAL: ONE GOOD TURN DESERVES ANOTHER.

Activity 3

4. The story is about a clever mouse that helps a lion to get out of a trap.

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What are tags? tag icon

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