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Assignments for Part II

Module by: Ruth Dunn. E-mail the author

Summary: Minority Studies: A Brief Sociological Text is a very, very brief textbook suitable for use as a supplemental or stand-alone text in a college-level minority studies Sociology course. Any instructor who would choose to use this as a stand-alone textbook would need to supply a large amount of statistical data and other pertinent and extraneous Sociological material in order to "flesh-out" fully this course. Each module/unit of Minority Studies: A Brief Sociological Text contains the text, course objectives, a study guide, key terms and concepts, a lecture outline, assignments, and a reading list.

Suggested Assignments for Part II—Race and Ethnicity

Essay: Discuss race and ethnic relations in terms of information from peer reviewed journals.

Essay: Discuss race and ethnic relations in terms of information from popular media articles.

Essay: Discuss the differences and similarities in the findings of peer reviewed articles and popular media articles concerning the racial disparities in arrest, convictions, and sentencing based on race and ethnicity.

Essay: Find information about each racial and ethnic group and compare and contrast them demographically.

Essay: Identify and discuss the racial disparities in arrest, convictions, and sentencing based on race and ethnicity.

Find on the Internet: Immigration laws past and present.

Find on the Internet: Information about naturalization laws and procedures.

Find on the Internet: Population data about the various racial and ethnic groups identified by the US Census Bureau.

Find on the Internet: Statistical data about race and ethnicity and the law.

Find on the Internet: Statistical data about undocumented immigrants.

Find on the Internet: US Census Bureau data about housing, health care, home ownership, business ownership, educational attainment, and labor force participation of each of the racial and ethnic groups in the US.

Find on the Internet: US Census Bureau data about the number of immigrants who come to the US each year and their countries of origin.

Find on the Internet: WPA slave narratives.

In-Class Discussion: Discuss the “rightness” of the way race and ethnicity were addressed in the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.

In-Class Discussion: How do we account for the racial and ethnic differences in housing, health care, home ownership, business ownership, educational attainment, labor force participation of each of the racial and ethnic groups in the US.

In-Class Discussion: Identify and discuss the racial disparities in arrest, convictions, and sentencing based on race and ethnicity.

In-Class Discussion: Identify examples of bigotry and prejudice against immigrants.

In-Class Discussion: Identify examples of bigotry and prejudice.

In-Class Discussion: Identify examples of prejudice and discrimination in the Constitution and in the Declaration of Independence.

In-Class Discussion: Identify examples of white privilege.

In-Class Discussion: Is the US a melting pot, a lumpy stew, a tossed salad? Are we an assimilationist/assimilated society or a pluralistic society? What should we be?

In-Class Discussion: Read aloud from WPA slave narratives and discuss the similarities and differences among them.

In-Class Discussion: Should English be the “official” language of the United States?

In-Class Discussion: Should the different racial and ethnic groups be “as the fingers on the hand” as Booker T. Washington argued?

In-Class Discussion: Should the United States change its immigration policies?

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Black Elk Speaks by John G. Niehardt.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Bless Me Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Brown by Richard Rodriguez.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Like Water for Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies by Laura Esquivel.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: The Declining Significance of Race by William Julius Wilson.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: The Spirit Catches You and Then You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman.

Oral Book Review and Discussion: Up from Slavery by Booker T. Washington.

Present to the Class: A timeline of bigotry in the form of a chart covering all racial and ethnic groups.

Present to the Class: Demographic data about housing, health care, home ownership, business ownership, educational attainment, and labor force participation of legal and illegal immigrants in the US in the US in the form of a chart.

Present to the Class: Information about the legal immigration and naturalization process in the United States in the form of a chart.

Present to the Class: Past, present, and future data about the demographic changes in the United States in the form of a chart.

Present to the Class: Population data about the various racial and ethnic groups in the US in the form of a chart.

Present to the Class: Statistical data about the racial disparities in arrest, convictions, and sentencing based on race and ethnicity in the form of a chart.

Read: Black Elk Speaks by John G. Niehardt.

Read: Bless Me Ultima by Rudolfo Anaya.

Read: Brown by Richard Rodriguez.

Read: Like Water for Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies by Laura Esquivel.

Read: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave by Frederick Douglass.

Read:The “Atlanta Compromise” speech by Booker T. Washington.

Read: The Constitution of the United States of America.

Read: The Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen United States of America.

Read: The Declining Significance of Race by William Julius Wilson.

Read: The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros.

Read: The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. DuBois.

Read: The Spirit Catches You and Then You Fall Down by Anne Fadiman.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about ethnicity and minority group relations.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about illegal immigration.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about immigration by Alejandro Portes.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about legal immigration.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about race and ethnicity and the criminal justice system.

Read: Three to five peer reviewed articles about race and race relations.

Read: Three to five popular media articles about ethnicity and ethnic group relations.

Read: Three to five popular media articles about illegal immigration.

Read: Three to five popular media articles about legal immigration.

Read: Three to five popular media articles about race and ethnicity and the criminal justice system.

Read: Three to five popular media articles about race and race relations.

Read: Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington.

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