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Reading and Writing Whole Numbers

Module by: Denny Burzynski, Wade Ellis. E-mail the authorsEdited By: Math Editors

Summary: This module is from Fundamentals of Mathematics by Denny Burzynski and Wade Ellis, Jr. This module discusses how to read and write whole numbers. By the end of this module, students should be able to read and write whole numbers.

Section Overview

  • Reading Whole Numbers
  • Writing Whole Numbers

Because our number system is a positional number system, reading and writing whole numbers is quite simple.

Reading Whole Numbers

To convert a number that is formed by digits into a verbal phrase, use the following method:

  1. Beginning at the right and working right to left, separate the number into distinct periods by inserting commas every three digits.
  2. Beginning at the left, read each period individually, saying the period name.

Sample Set A

Write the following numbers as words.

Example 1

Read 42958.

  1. Beginning at the right, we can separate this number into distinct periods by inserting a comma between the 2 and 9.
    42,958
  2. Beginning at the left, we read each period individually:
    Three segments within the thousands period, with a 4 and a 2 in the second and third segments. To the right is a comma, and the label, forty-two thousand.
    Three segments within the units period, with a 9, a 5, and an 8 in the segment. To the right is the label, nine hundred fifty-eight.
    Forty-two thousand, nine hundred fifty-eight.

Example 2

Read 307991343.

  1. Beginning at the right, we can separate this number into distinct periods by placing commas between the 1 and 3 and the 7 and 9.
    307,991,343
  2. Beginning at the left, we read each period individually.
    Three segments within the millions period, with a 3, a 0, and a 7 in the segments. To the right is a comma, and the label, three hundred seven million.
    Three segments within the thousands period, with a 9, a 9, and a 1 in the segments. To the right is a comma, and the label, nine hundred ninety-one thousand.
    Three segments within the units period, with a 3, a 4, and a 3 in the segments. To the right is the label, three hundred forty-three.
    Three hundred seven million, nine hundred ninety-one thousand, three hundred forty-three.

Example 3

Read 36000000000001.

  1. Beginning at the right, we can separate this number into distinct periods by placing commas. 36,000,000,001
  2. Beginning at the left, we read each period individually.
    Three segments within the trillions period, with a 3 and a 6 in the second and third segments. To the right is a comma, and the label, thirty six trillion.  Three segments within the billions period, with a 0 in each segment. To the right is a comma, and the label, zero billion.  Three segments within the millions period, with a 0 in each segment. To the right is a comma, and the label, zero million.  Three segments within the units period, with a 0 in each segment. To the right is a comma, and the label, zero thousand.  Three segments within the units period, with a 0 in the first two segments, and a 1 in the third segment. To the right is the label, one.
    Thirty-six trillion, one.

Practice Set A

Write each number in words.

Exercise 1

12,542

Solution

Twelve thousand, five hundred forty-two

Exercise 2

101,074,003

Solution

One hundred one million, seventy-four thousand, three

Exercise 3

1,000,008

Solution

One million, eight

Writing Whole Numbers

To express a number in digits that is expressed in words, use the following method:

  1. Notice first that a number expressed as a verbal phrase will have its periods set off by commas.
  2. Starting at the beginning of the phrase, write each period of numbers individu­ally.
  3. Using commas to separate periods, combine the periods to form one number.

Sample Set B

Write each number using digits.

Example 4

Seven thousand, ninety-two.

Using the comma as a period separator, we have

the words seven thousand, in a bracket, pointing to the number 7, followed by a comma. The words ninety-two, in a bracket, pointing to the number 092.

7,092

Example 5

Fifty billion, one million, two hundred thousand, fourteen.

Using the commas as period separators, we have

Fifty billion, one million, two hundred thousand, fourteen, separated by periods, with their corresponding numbers to the side of each period.

50,001,200,014

Example 6

Ten million, five hundred twelve.

The comma sets off the periods. We notice that there is no thousands period. We'll have to insert this ourselves.

Ten million, zero thousand, fife hundred twelve, separated by periods, with their corresponding numbers to the side of each period.

10,000,512

Practice Set B

Express each number using digits.

Exercise 4

One hundred three thousand, twenty-five.

Solution

103,025

Exercise 5

Six million, forty thousand, seven.

Solution

6,040,007

Exercise 6

Twenty trillion, three billion, eighty million, one hundred nine thousand, four hundred two.

Solution

20,003,080,109,402

Exercise 7

Eighty billion, thirty-five.

Solution

80,000,000,035

Exercises

For the following problems, write all numbers in words.

Exercise 8

912

Solution

nine hundred twelve

Exercise 9

84

Exercise 10

1491

Solution

one thousand, four hundred ninety-one

Exercise 11

8601

Exercise 12

35,223

Solution

thirty-five thousand, two hundred twenty-three

Exercise 13

71,006

Exercise 14

437,105

Solution

four hundred thirty-seven thousand, one hundred five

Exercise 15

201,040

Exercise 16

8,001,001

Solution

eight million, one thousand, one

Exercise 17

16,000,053

Exercise 18

770,311,101

Solution

seven hundred seventy million, three hundred eleven thousand, one hundred one

Exercise 19

83,000,000,007

Exercise 20

106,100,001,010

Solution

one hundred six billion, one hundred million, one thousand ten

Exercise 21

3,333,444,777

Exercise 22

800,000,800,000

Solution

eight hundred billion, eight hundred thousand

Exercise 23

A particular community college has 12,471 students enrolled.

Exercise 24

A person who watches 4 hours of television a day spends 1460 hours a year watching T.V.

Solution

four; one thousand, four hundred sixty

Exercise 25

Astronomers believe that the age of the earth is about 4,500,000,000 years.

Exercise 26

Astronomers believe that the age of the universe is about 20,000,000,000 years.

Solution

twenty billion

Exercise 27

There are 9690 ways to choose four objects from a collection of 20.

Exercise 28

If a 412 page book has about 52 sentences per page, it will contain about 21,424 sentences.

Solution

four hundred twelve; fifty-two; twenty-one thousand, four hundred twenty-four

Exercise 29

In 1980, in the United States, there was $1,761,000,000,000 invested in life insurance.

Exercise 30

In 1979, there were 85,000 telephones in Alaska and 2,905,000 telephones in Indiana.

Solution

one thousand, nine hundred seventy-nine; eighty-five thousand; two million, nine hundred five thousand

Exercise 31

In 1975, in the United States, it is estimated that 52,294,000 people drove to work alone.

Exercise 32

In 1980, there were 217 prisoners under death sentence that were divorced.

Solution

one thousand, nine hundred eighty; two hundred seventeen

Exercise 33

In 1979, the amount of money spent in the United States for regular-session college educa­tion was $50,721,000,000,000.

Exercise 34

In 1981, there were 1,956,000 students majoring in business in U.S. colleges.

Solution

one thousand, nine hundred eighty one; one million, nine hundred fifty-six thousand

Exercise 35

In 1980, the average fee for initial and follow up visits to a medical doctors office was about $34.

Exercise 36

In 1980, there were approximately 13,100 smugglers of aliens apprehended by the Immigration border patrol.

Solution

one thousand, nine hundred eighty; thirteen thousand, one hundred

Exercise 37

In 1980, the state of West Virginia pumped 2,000,000 barrels of crude oil, whereas Texas pumped 975,000,000 barrels.

Exercise 38

The 1981 population of Uganda was 12,630,000 people.

Solution

twelve million, six hundred thirty thousand

Exercise 39

In 1981, the average monthly salary offered to a person with a Master's degree in mathematics was $1,685.

For the following problems, write each number using digits.

Exercise 40

Six hundred eighty-one

Solution

681

Exercise 41

Four hundred ninety

Exercise 42

Seven thousand, two hundred one

Solution

7,201

Exercise 43

Nineteen thousand, sixty-five

Exercise 44

Five hundred twelve thousand, three

Solution

512,003

Exercise 45

Two million, one hundred thirty-three thousand, eight hundred fifty-nine

Exercise 46

Thirty-five million, seven thousand, one hundred one

Solution

35,007,101

Exercise 47

One hundred million, one thousand

Exercise 48

Sixteen billion, fifty-nine thousand, four

Solution

16,000,059,004

Exercise 49

Nine hundred twenty billion, four hundred sev­enteen million, twenty-one thousand

Exercise 50

Twenty-three billion

Solution

23,000,000,000

Exercise 51

Fifteen trillion, four billion, nineteen thousand, three hundred five

Exercise 52

One hundred trillion, one

Solution

100,000,000,000,001

Exercises for Review

Exercise 53

((Reference)) How many digits are there?

Exercise 54

((Reference)) In the number 6,641, how many tens are there?

Solution

4

Exercise 55

((Reference)) What is the value of 7 in 44,763?

Exercise 56

((Reference)) Is there a smallest whole number? If so, what is it?

Solution

yes, zero

Exercise 57

((Reference)) Write a four-digit number with a 9 in the tens position.

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