Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Collaborative Statistics Using R » Preface

Navigation

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Preface

Module by: Ananda Mahto. E-mail the author

Based on: Preface to "Collaborative Statistics" by Susan Dean, Barbara Illowsky, Ph.D.

Summary: This module introduces the Connexions online textbook "Collaborative Statistics Using R" by Ananda Mahto based on "Collaborative Statistics" by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean.

About "Collaborative Statistics"

Collaborative Statistics was written by Barbara Illowsky and Susan Dean, faculty members at De Anza College in Cupertino, California.

The original preface to the book as written by professors Illowsky and Dean, now follows:

This book is intended for introductory statistics courses being taken by students at two– and four–year colleges who are majoring in fields other than math or engineering. Intermediate algebra is the only prerequisite. The book focuses on applications of statistical knowledge rather than the theory behind it. The text is named Collaborative Statistics because students learn best by doing. In fact, they learn best by working in small groups. The old saying “two heads are better than one” truly applies here.

Our emphasis in this text is on four main concepts:

  • thinking statistically
  • incorporating technology
  • working collaboratively
  • writing thoughtfully

These concepts are integral to our course. Students learn the best by actively participating, not by just watching and listening. Teaching should be highly interactive. Students need to be thoroughly engaged in the learning process in order to make sense of statistical concepts. Collaborative Statistics provides techniques for students to write across the curriculum, to collaborate with their peers, to think statistically, and to incorporate technology.

This book takes students step by step. The text is interactive. Therefore, students can immediately apply what they read. Once students have completed the process of problem solving, they can tackle interesting and challenging problems relevant to today’s world. The problems require the students to apply their newly found skills. The book also contains labs that use real data and practices that lead students step by step through the problem solving process.

About this custom edition of Collaborative Statistics

This custom edition of Collaborative Statistics is designed for use in a short course in introductory statistics. Additionally, the text includes examples of how to use the R-project open-source statistical package for the calculations.

R software was chosen for several reasons. First, it is free. Second, it is relatively easy to learn once you actually start using it. Third, the software is stable and quite advanced; there are many features implemented in R that are not found in commercial software packages. Fourth, R has great community support; if there are any questions you might have, there are numerous user-groups which can help you solve your problems.

We hope that you enjoy the process of learning about statistics and simultaneously learning how to use R.

R code listings

Code listings in this text have been formatted in a way to make it easy to copy and paste from this document into an R script or an R session. All comments are preceded by a single hash symbol (#), and all sample output is preceded by two hash symbols (##). These are seen as comments by the R software, so will not be processed when you run your code.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks