Skip to content Skip to navigation

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » Dead Kids Walking!

Navigation

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Dead Kids Walking!

Module by: Joshua Nelson. E-mail the author

Summary: For this lesson plan, students will read The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. They will then be acting out scenes of the play, and work together to alter the story as they see fit. Students will explore cause and effect in terms of story development, and brainstorm to predict ideas from the story.

Joshua Nelson

Christopher M. Tandy

Holly Storey

11-23-2010

EDUU 688

Lesson Plan Assignment

Summary –

For this lesson plan, students will read The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman. They will then be acting out scenes of the play, and work together to alter the story as they see fit. Students will explore cause and effect in terms of story development, and brainstorm to predict ideas from the story.

Materials Needed

Paper/Pencils/Books/Markers/Paints. These will allow the students to both brainstorm ideas and create props. There might be additional materials needed depending on what the students decide to use for their vignette’s.

The Graveyard Book – Neil Gaiman

This is a story of an ordinary boy with some not so ordinary experiences. He lives in a graveyard, is educated by ghosts, and has a guardian that is neither alive or dead. Bod faces many dangers/adventures in his graveyard home. If Bod leaves the graveyard, Jack (the man who killed Bod’s family) will seek him out and kill him too!

Standards

Narrative Analysis of Grade-Level-Appropriate Text (Grade 7)

3.2 Identify events that advance the plot and determine how each event explains past or present action(s) or foreshadows future action(s).

3.3 Analyze characterization as delineated through a character’s thoughts, words, speech patterns, and actions; the narrator’s description; and the thoughts, words, and actions of other characters.

Time

30 minutes a day for 2 weeks (minimum). Of course this depends on how long classes are as well as how quickly students can create their products.

Preparation

Preparation on the teacher’s part is rather minimal – other than providing supplies and managing the student’s time. Once the students have read the sections of the book required all that is needed is for the students to have access to the materials to be able to develop their props and practice their vignettes.

Prerequisites

Read the first chapter of the book and beyond if necessary. But since the vignette should only deal with the first chapter it is not required to read past that for this lesson.

Activity

Vignette Play:

In groups of 7, act out the first chapter of the book, they can build props, backdrops, re-write dialogue, utilize creative interpretation, and possibly re-write certain scenes.

Thinking Map:

Cause and Effect – we would use this thinking map in order to assess different events in the first chapter and how they affect Bod. We could also apply this to other events throughout the first chapter and what sort effects those have.

Adaptations

EL: Partner EL learners with fluent students to read to one another, ask and record questions regard vocabulary

Must Do/May Do: Re-Draw the first chapter. Make a comic book out of the first chapter. Write a comparison and contract response regarding Bod’s life and their own.

Assessment –

Assessment would occur throughout the time spent on the project. The teacher is responsible for gauging how much time and effort the students are putting into their individual roles as well as how much of a team player they are being. The students will not be graded as a team, but will be graded in regards to how much they helped their team succeed in their goals.

Closure –

Student groups would be able to act out their vignettes in front of the rest of the class. Students would be able to give feedback to the groups – pointing out things that they liked about the group and what they did well. Students would also be asked to write a short response to the activity – indicating whether or not they liked the activity and whether or not they would be interesting in doing more activities of a similar nature.

Rubric -

Student Name -

Participation w/ group /20

Detail of props /10

Closeness to actual text /30

Themes of book conveyed /20

Participation in thinking map /10

Total: /90

Comments:

Content actions

Download module as:

Add module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks