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What is a lens?

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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Affiliated with (What does "Affiliated with" mean?)

This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.

Also in these lenses

  • Lens for Engineering

    This collection is included inLens: Lens for Engineering
    By: Sidney Burrus

    Click the "Lens for Engineering" link to see all content selected in this lens.

  • richb's DSP display tagshide tags

    This collection is included inLens: richb's DSP resources
    By: Richard Baraniuk

    Comments:

    "My introduction to signal processing course at Rice University."

    Click the "richb's DSP" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

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Getting Started With Mathematica

Module by: Catherine Elder, Dan Calderon. E-mail the authors

Summary: This module is a starting point for embedding Content using Mathematica CDF.

What is Mathematica?

Mathematica is a computational software program used in technical fields. It is developed by Wolfram Research. Mathematica makes it easy to visualize data and create GUIs in only a few lines of code.

How can I run, create, and find Mathematica files?

Run

The free CDF Player is available for running non-commercial Mathematica programs. The option exists of downloading source files and running on your computer, but the CDF-player comes with a plug-in for viewing dynamic content online on your web browser!

Create

Mathematica 8 is available for purchase from Wolfram. Many universities (including Rice) and companies already have a Mathematica license. Wolfram has a free, save-disabled 15-day trial version of Mathematica.

Find

Wolfram has thousands of Mathematica programs (including source code) available at the Wolfram Demonstrations Project. Anyone can create and submit a Demonstration. Also, many other websites (including Connexions) have a lot of Mathematica content.

What do I need to run interactive content?

Mathematica 8 is supported on Linux, Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, and Solaris. Mathematica's free CDF-player is available for Windows and Mac OS X, and is in development for Linux; the CDF-Player plugin is available for IE, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and Opera.

How can I upload a Mathematica file to a Connexions module?

Go to the Files tab at the top of the module and upload your .cdf file, along with an (optional) screenshot of the file in use. In order to generate a clean bracket-less screenshot, you should do the following:

  • Open your .cdf in Mathematica and left click on the bracket surrounding the manipulate command.
  • Click on Cell->Convert To->Bitmap.
  • Then click on File->Save Selection As, and save the image file in your desired image format.

Embed the files into the module in any way you like. Some tags you may find helpful include image, figure, download, and link (if linking to an .cdf file on another website). The best method is to create an interactive figure, and include a fallback png image of the cdf file should the CDF image not render properly. See the interactive demo/image below.

Convolution Demo

<figure id="demoonline">
<media id="CNXdemoonline" alt="timeshiftDemo">
<image mime-type="image/png" src="Convolutiondisplay-4.cdf" thumbnail="Convolution4.0Display.png" width="600"/>
<object width="500" height="500" src="Convolutiondisplay-4.cdf" mime-type="application/vnd.wolfram.cdf" for="webview2.0"/>
<image mime-type="application/postscript" for="pdf" src="Convolution4.0Display.png" width="400"/>
</media>
<caption>Interact (when online) with a Mathematica CDF demonstrating Convolution. To Download, right-click and save target as .cdf.%lt;/caption>
</figure>

Figure 1: Interact (when online) with a Mathematica CDF demonstrating Convolution. To Download, right-click and save target as .cdf.
timeshiftDemo

Alternatively, this is how it looks when you use a thumbnail link to a live online demo.

Figure 2: Click on the above thumbnail image (when online) to view an interactive Mathematica Player demonstrating Convolution.
Convolution Demo

How can I learn Mathematica?

Open Mathematica and go to the Getting Started section of the "Welcome to Mathematica" screen, or check out Help: Documentation Center.

The Mathematica Learning Center has lots of screencasts, how-tos, and tutorials.

When troubleshooting, the error messages are often unhelpful, so it's best to evaluate often so the problem can be easily located. Search engines like Google are useful when you're looking for an explanation of specific error messages.

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PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

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Module as:

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Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks