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Syllabus - English 101

Module by: Scrub Hubner. E-mail the author

Summary: Syllabus for English 101.

Table 1
graphics1.png eng 101 Online5 CreditsCourse Syllabus Scrub HubnerEmail: mhubner@btc.ctc.eduPhone: 360-752-8571Office Hours: 24/7WAOL Tech Support: 1-866-425-8412

I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can. – Hemingway

English 101 Online is a course designed to help you write effectively at the college level. You will read, analyze, and write essays using a variety of rhetorical strategies, as well as develop and express ideas clearly and effectively. Performing competently at this level requires skills in critical reading and thinking, and the ability to accurately analyze what will make your writing more effective in any given context. Writing is a process which includes brainstorming, prewriting, peer editing, drafting and publishing. It requires patience, time and commitment. Since a great deal of the work involves a dialog between you and other students, it is imperative to post submissions in a timely manner.

IMPORTANT :

Many students have the misconception that online classes require less work.

Although online courses do allow for flexibility of time spent on class work, they require a significant time commitment. Furthermore, work deadlines still exist. A general rule of thumb for a 5-credit class would be 10 hours of work per week. You need to determine if you have the organizational skills and motivation to meet those demands.

The first week of the quarter will be spent on activities that will demonstrate your ability to navigate the online environment. The Angel Week Zero tutorial should be completed on or before Day One. (If you have visited the tutorial previously, a brief revisit is strongly advised.)

Finally, read all course materials completely. (Reading them more than once is a good idea. They can also be printed for future reference.)

Prerequisite: Accuplacer score of 86 or higher on the Sentence Skills and 85 or higher on Reading.

COURSE LAYOUT

The 11-week course will be divided into three major “Modules” and a “Final.” Modules may extend from a day or two to several weeks. It is important to get an overview of each module as it begins. This will give you an idea of the work involved and how you might need to organize your time. Each module will define the minimum expectations for student postings.

REQUIRED STUDENT SUPPLIES & MATERIALS :

The Writer’s Presence: A Pool of Readings: Sixth Ed – McQuade.

The Absolutely True Autobiography of a Part-Time Indian - Alexie

(See the note in Lessons/Getting Started/Textbooks.) A Writer’s Reference: Sixth Ed. - Hacker

Computer and internet access

COURSE OUTCOMES:

  • Employ standard and innovative rhetorical techniques to compose focused, substantive papers with source documentation.
  • Develop critical reading skills using a variety of text sources

 STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (Course competencies):

To successfully meet the requirements of English 101, the student should be able to:

  • Use a writing process for all written assignments.
  • Select appropriate composition topics; effectively gather and organize material corresponding to those topics; develop essays that meet standard on the Writing Assessment Grid.
  • Use a variety of effective sentence and paragraph designs to convey meaning.
  • Analyze and employ a variety of rhetorical techniques to effectively develop a thesis.
  • Critically analyze assigned readings and texts orally and in writing.
  • Analyze and provide feedback on peer essays, critically examining: (1) subject or topic, (2) purpose, (3) audience, (4) style, and (5) tone.

EVALUATION AND GRADING STANDARDS:

Written work, tests, and postings will be graded and/or acknowledged. In order to pass the class, all essays must be completed.

Grading will be as follows (fractional values are not rounded up):

Table 2
93-100% A Four compositions = 50%
90-92.9% A- Tests and Quizzes = 20%
87-89.9% B+ Participation / Peer response = 15%
83-86.9% B Reading portfolio / Journal = 15%
80-82.9% B-  
77-79.9% C+  
73-76.9% C  
70-72.9% C-  
67-69.9% D+  
60-66.9% D  
Below 60% F  

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

  • Textbook reading and assignments
  • Supplemental readings (e.g., instructor handouts) and materials
  • Peer response (threaded discussions)
  • Individual “conferences”
  • Group interactions (Wikis, Blogs)
  • Electronic resources

COMPOSITIONS:

Over the course of the quarter, you will write and post a minimum of four essays: personal narrative, argumentative/persuasive/expository essay, literary analysis, and final. We will go through an extensive writing process on all four essays which will include brainstorming (as a group and on your own), thesis statement generation, outlining, and lots of drafting and editing. Peer-editing is a required element of the course and will be a key component of your drafting process. Each paper (with the exception of the personal narrative) will require the use of primary and secondary sources to craft an effective document.

Final essay submissions must adhere to the following manuscript guidelines:

  • Format – .doc or .docx (Microsoft Word) or .rtf
  • Font – Times New Roman, 12 point
  • Margins – standard (usually one inch)
  • Paragraphs – indented, all text double-spaced
  • 4-line heading (upper left) – Name, Instructor, Course/Assignment, Date

LATE WORK WILL RECEIVE ONLY HALF CREDIT! DO NOT PROCRASTINATE!

READING PORTFOLIO (Dialectical Journal):

During the quarter, you will post reading log entries summarizing, reacting to, and analyzing the weekly assigned readings. Entries must be original work. In addition, you will be reading the posts of other students and responding to them.

PARTICIPATION :

Participation counts significantly in this course. Group “discussion,” analysis, and peer editing are key components of English 101, and the success of the class depends on your active participation. In general, every student is a “team player” who can help make the class a worthwhile experience for all. Although an online class provides significant latitude in scheduling work time, you are strongly urged to log on daily to check the course mail and announcements.

CHEATING and PLAGIARISM:

Cheating and plagiarism fall under the Student Code of Conduct. If detected, they will result in failing the class. A copy of the student code is available from Student Services.

After spending more than 30 years as an instructor, I have a pretty good ear for student writing. I am also fairly competent at using electronic resources to track down possible plagiarism. PLAGIARIZING IS NOT WORTH THE RISK!

*To receive classroom accommodations, registration with Disability Support Services (DSS) is required. Call 360)752-8450, email mgerard@btc.ctc.edu or stop by the DSS Office in the Counseling and Career Center, Room 106, College Services Building.

WRITING ASSESSMENT GRID

Table 3
LEVEL ONE - BEGINNING:
  • Does not meet assignment requirements.
  • Lacks focus, organization and purpose.
  • Revision efforts are lacking.
  • minimal.
  • Sentence, spelling and usage errors interfere with meaning.
  • Research not included
  • Formatting of paper is incorrect
LEVEL TWO - DEVELOPING:
  • Partially meets assignment requirements.
  • Topic is identified and addressed but not fully developed.
  • Use of unexplained concepts or unclear language.
  • Content/style/level inappropriate to audience.
  • Revision efforts minimal.
  • Lacks clear organization, sequence, or paragraph structure.
  • Contain grammatical errors that distract the reader.
  • Formatting contains errors.
  • . . .
  • Research is inadequate or inaccurately cited.
LEVEL THREE - COMPETENT
  • Content meets assignment requirements.
  • Information is clear, concise, and complete.
  • Introduction, body, and conclusion are effective.
  • Paragraphs are focused.
  • Paragraphs are focused.
  • Revision efforts are significant.
  • Wording is original to writer.
  • Information, tone, and style are appropriate to intended audience
  • Sentences are complete and smooth.
  • Contains few spelling, punctuation, or usage errors.
  • Correct formats are used.
  • Research is adequate and correctly cited.
LEVEL FOUR - MASTERY:
All of Level 3, plus the following:
  • Writer’s thesis and rhetorical strategies are innovative as well as effective
  • Elements such as introductions and transitions and overall structure reflect
excellent focus and coherence.
  • Revision efforts are holistic and go beyond instructor and peer comments
  • Topic is explored and explained in depth.
  • Research is used for maximum effect.
  • Final product demonstrates flawless formatting and editing.

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