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Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

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Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

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This content is either by members of the organizations listed or about topics related to the organizations listed. Click each link to see a list of all content affiliated with the organization.
  • CNX Documentation display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Connexions Documentation
    By: ConnexionsAs a part of collection: "Connexions Tutorial and Reference"

    Comments:

    "The canonical how-to guide to using Connexions."

    Click the "CNX Documentation" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

  • JVLA Affiliated display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: Jesuit Virtual Learning Academy Affiliated Material
    By: Jesuit Virtual Learning AcademyAs a part of collection: "Connexions Tutorial and Reference"

    Click the "JVLA Affiliated" link to see all content affiliated with them.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

Also in these lenses

  • OER/LOR Connexions T display tagshide tags

    This module is included inLens: OER/LOR Connexions Training
    By: ConnexionsAs a part of collection: "Connexions Tutorial and Reference"

    Comments:

    "This collection has the basic training for authoring modules (chapters/sections) and collections (textbooks/courses etc)."

    Click the "OER/LOR Connexions T" link to see all content selected in this lens.

    Click the tag icon tag icon to display tags associated with this content.

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These tags come from the endorsement, affiliation, and other lenses that include this content.
 

Work Areas Overview

Module by: Connexions. E-mail the author

Summary: This module describes the different types of Work Areas, and how to create and delete public/collaborative Workgroups.

Connexions Work Areas

Connexions provides two types of areas in which to work on content: My Workspace and Workgroups. You can create, edit, and manage content in both work areas. The difference between the types of work areas is user access. "My Workspace" is a private work area. Only you can access it and view or modify its contents. "Workgroups" are for collaborative projects. Their contents can be accessed by a group of users and each of the group members can view or modify its contents. "Workgroups" must be created by you. You can create multiple workgroups, one for each project. Both of these types of work areas are described in this module.

My Workspace

Every person with a Connexions account has their own "My Workspace". It was created automatically when their Connexions account was set up. "My Workspace" is your personal work area in Connexions where you can work independently of anyone else. In this work area you can keep your own modules, files, and collections that no one else can view or modify. Many authors prefer to work on modules or collections in "My Workspace" before moving them to a workgroup where a group of collaborators can make comments or edit the material.

Note:

It is best to keep only one working copy of any one content; therefore be sure to use "Cut" and "Paste" to move content to a Workgroup instead of "Copy" and "Paste".

You can display your personal work area from a Connexions web page by clicking on the My Workspace link in the navigation sidebar on the left side of the page.

Workgroups

A workgroup is a private "scratch area" where a group of Connexions authors can collaborate on a common set of modules. This allows authors working together to see their progress without letting the rest of the world see their work.

Warning:

Remember that workgroups are not a substitute for communication between collaborators. The members of a workgroup must communicate openly because all the members in a workgroup have the same level of privilege. Any member in a workgroup may add or remove another member and modify, add, or remove content. The creator of a workgroup has no extra privileges.

Modules, collections, and other uploaded files can be included in each workgroup. The members of the workgroup can create new content in the workgroup, or can checkout existing content (or derive a copy of content) from the Content Repository. Once content is placed in the workgroup, any member of the workgroup may modify it. To publish modified content, a person must have the maintainer role for that module or collection. For more on this see Editing Module Roles.

The names of the workgroups of which you are a member are listed in the navigation sidebar on the left side of the page. You can display the contents of a workgroup by clicking on the name of the workgroup.

Creating a New Workgroup

To create a workgroup, use the following steps:

  1. Click Create a workgroup in the "Workspaces" sidebar. The "Create Workgroup" screen displays.
  2. Type the name of the workgroup in the "Name" field.
  3. (Optional) Type a group e-mail address in the "Email" field. This should be a common e-mail address or mailing list that is shared by all members of the workgroup.
  4. (Optional) Type a description of the workgroup in the "Description" field.(optional)
  5. Click Create. The screen for the new workgroup displays.

Since it is a new workgroup, it has no content and you are its only member. See Managing Work Area Contents for a description of how to add content to the new workgroup. See Managing Workgroup Members for a description of how to add members to the new workgroup.

Deleting a Workgroup

A workgroup is deleted when it no longer has any members. If you want to delete a workgroup, you must remove all the members of the workgroup, including yourself. To delete a workgroup, use the following steps:

  1. Click on the green "Members" tab at the top of the Workgroup.
  2. Select the checkbox in the "Remove" column next to every member's name, including your own..
  3. Click Remove selected users from group. The "Delete Workgroup" confirmation screen displays.
  4. Click Yes, Delete it. All members are removed from the Workgroup, the Workgroup is deleted, and the Workgroup name is removed from the navigation sidebar of all members of the Workgroup. Any published content located in the Workgroup will not be deleted; to edit or modify it, you will need to check it out to another Work Area.

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My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks