Skip to content Skip to navigation Skip to collection information

OpenStax-CNX

You are here: Home » Content » A Brief Introduction to Engineering Computation with MATLAB » Study Guide

Navigation

Recently Viewed

This feature requires Javascript to be enabled.
 

Study Guide

Module by: Serhat Beyenir. E-mail the author

Summary: Study guide for learners.

MATLAB, a sub-course of Computer Technology 1 and this text are specifically designed for students with no programming experience. However, students are expected to be proficient in First Year Mathematics and Sciences and access to good reference books are highly recommended. I also assume that students have a working knowledge of the Mac OS X or Microsoft Windows operating systems.

The strategic goal of the course and book is to provide learners with an appreciation for the role computation plays in solving engineering problems. The MATLAB specific skills that I would like students to acquire are as follows:

  • Write scripts to solve engineering problems including interpolation, numerical integration and regression analysis,
  • Plot graphs to visualize, analyze and present numerical data,
  • Publish reports.

The best way to learn about engineering computation is to actually do it. We will therefore solve many engineering problems mainly using a recent version of MATLAB in this book. Since the primary focus is engineering computation, we will concentrate on the mathematical solutions and, to a limited extent, the graphical user interface (GUI) features of MATLAB.

Learning a new skill, especially a computer program, can be an overwhelming experience. To make the best of this process, students are encouraged to observe the following guidelines that have proven to work well:

  • Plan to study 2 hours outside of class for every hour inside of class,
  • Practice, practice, practice: As the old saying goes, practice makes one perfect or perhaps we should modify that statement: Good practice makes one perfect,
  • Buddy system: Study with a classmate. Helping one another drastically improves your understanding of the material. Particularly, students are advised to work the problem sets in this fashion,
  • Muddy points: Make a note of muddy points as they may occur during lectures and email your notes to me. I will address those issues at the beginning of the next class,
  • Open book exam: Do not try to memorize commands, functions or their syntax but learn where and how to find that information. Through many exercises and problem sets you will have solved by the end of the course, most computational routines will become second nature to you. The exam is open book, so keep your learning materials and m-files well organized.

Collection Navigation

Content actions

Download:

Collection as:

PDF | EPUB (?)

What is an EPUB file?

EPUB is an electronic book format that can be read on a variety of mobile devices.

Downloading to a reading device

For detailed instructions on how to download this content's EPUB to your specific device, click the "(?)" link.

| More downloads ...

Module as:

PDF | More downloads ...

Add:

Collection to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks

Module to:

My Favorites (?)

'My Favorites' is a special kind of lens which you can use to bookmark modules and collections. 'My Favorites' can only be seen by you, and collections saved in 'My Favorites' can remember the last module you were on. You need an account to use 'My Favorites'.

| A lens I own (?)

Definition of a lens

Lenses

A lens is a custom view of the content in the repository. You can think of it as a fancy kind of list that will let you see content through the eyes of organizations and people you trust.

What is in a lens?

Lens makers point to materials (modules and collections), creating a guide that includes their own comments and descriptive tags about the content.

Who can create a lens?

Any individual member, a community, or a respected organization.

What are tags? tag icon

Tags are descriptors added by lens makers to help label content, attaching a vocabulary that is meaningful in the context of the lens.

| External bookmarks