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Different Experiences of Emotion

Module by: Mark Pettinelli. E-mail the author

Everyone has their own unique experience of emotion - that is obvious. I would further theorize, however, that each different personality type (however many you think there are), has its own unique experience of emotion associated with it. For instance I know that artists can have a unique experience of emotion through their art.

Some people experience emotion in an obvious way, while others experience it in a more subtle way - but probably still equal. I have observed that there are many different variations, but all with the same goal - to experience life in some sort of intense form.

The example for that would be that someone you initially don't observe as being intense is actually intense in some way you didn't notice. The largest example of this I would say is the difference between males and females, males could be labeled as being aggressively intense, while females are passively intense.

There are going to be specific things that each person does to maintain his or her own balance of intensity and non-intensity. No one has everything - stupidity, calmness, intensity, intelligence, simplicity, creativity, logic - they all are felt in each person and balanced in various ways.

In fact, if such a balancing system ceases to function, it could be the cause of a mental illness. For instance if you fail to get along with people you might become depressed, maybe your creativity decreased and your simplicity increased so people don't like you anymore.

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